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44 Total Pages 36 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, Oct-Dec 1923

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, Oct-Dec 1923” (Box 267, Folder 2) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. Correspondents include: George Gustav Heye, Harlan Smith, Frank Speck, Benjamin W. Bead, W. Wenzel, Mrs. Mary Livingston, Lillian Hathaway Means, T.A. Joyce, A.E. Jenks, Mrs. Collingswood, Arthur C. Parker, J.W. Benham, Joseph T. Gleason, Anderson Galleries, Zebalon Bartleman, Harmon Hendricks, Thea Heye, Charles A. Neff, Henry D. Paxson, W.A. Hunter, E. Louise White.

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84 Total Pages 46 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep 1904

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep 1904” (Box 265, Folder 12) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. George Hubbard Pepper (1873-1924) was instrumental in the creation of the Heye Museum collection, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Pepper, an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the study of the American Southwest, led several excavations to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon with the American Museum of Natural History (Hyde Exploring Expeditions) previous to meeting George Heye in 1904. Well connected within the world of American archaeology, Pepper helped Heye professionalize his museum practices in addition to leading expeditions for the MAI to Ecuador, Mexico, Georgia and the American Southwest. As a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association Pepper’s correspondence includes communications with many prominent collectors, archaeologists and anthropologists of the early 20th century.

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76 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep 1905

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep 1905” (Box 266, Folder 5) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. George Hubbard Pepper (1873-1924) was instrumental in the creation of the Heye Museum collection, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Pepper, an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the study of the American Southwest, led several excavations to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon with the American Museum of Natural History (Hyde Exploring Expeditions) previous to meeting George Heye in 1904. Well connected within the world of American archaeology, Pepper helped Heye professionalize his museum practices in addition to leading expeditions for the MAI to Ecuador, Mexico, Georgia and the American Southwest. As a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association Pepper’s correspondence includes communications with many prominent collectors, archaeologists and anthropologists of the early 20th century.

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24 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep-Oct 1903

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep-Oct 1903” (Box 265, Folder 5) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. George Hubbard Pepper (1873-1924) was instrumental in the creation of the Heye Museum collection, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Pepper, an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the study of the American Southwest, led several excavations to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon with the American Museum of Natural History (Hyde Exploring Expeditions) previous to meeting George Heye in 1904. Well connected within the world of American archaeology, Pepper helped Heye professionalize his museum practices in addition to leading expeditions for the MAI to Ecuador, Mexico, Georgia and the American Southwest. As a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association Pepper’s correspondence includes communications with many prominent collectors, archaeologists and anthropologists of the early 20th century.

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23 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, St. Agatha School Visit, Nov 1903

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, St. Agatha School Visit, Nov 1903” (Box 265, Folder 7) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. George Hubbard Pepper (1873-1924) was instrumental in the creation of the Heye Museum collection, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Pepper, an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the study of the American Southwest, led several excavations to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon with the American Museum of Natural History (Hyde Exploring Expeditions) previous to meeting George Heye in 1904. Well connected within the world of American archaeology, Pepper helped Heye professionalize his museum practices in addition to leading expeditions for the MAI to Ecuador, Mexico, Georgia and the American Southwest. As a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association Pepper’s correspondence includes communications with many prominent collectors, archaeologists and anthropologists of the early 20th century.

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46 Total Pages 52 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, undated

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, undated” (Box 267, Folder 5) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. Correspondents include: Frank Vorhies, William E. Hawks, Esther Putnam, George Gustav Heye, Teluli, Mary Atwell Moore, Pierre Lecomte du Noüy, Samuel K. Lothrop, Albert G. Heath, Mr. Carlton, Kaj Birket-Smith.

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133 Total Pages 94 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Grace Nicholson: Correspondence, William Benson, 1903-1911

Help us transcribe “Grace Nicholson: Correspondence, William Benson, 1903-1911” (Box 262, Folder 5) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. William Benson (Pomo) was a renowned basket maker born in Clear Lake, California. William and his wife Mary Knight Benson (Pomo) found artistic and commercial success weaving traditional Pomo baskets. They traveled widely, exhibiting their baskets, and developing relationships with art collectors, such as Grace Nicholson. Grace Nicholson was an art collector dealer who specialized in Native American and Asian arts and crafts. She moved to California following her parents and grandparents death, in 1901 and was soon purchasing Native American baskets and other artifacts in association with Carrol S. Hartman. Nicholson kept extensive diaries and notes on her buying trips through Native American territory, especially of the Karok, Klamath, and Pomo communities. Her notes included Native American legends, folklore, vocabulary, tribal festivals, basket making, the art trade, and living conditions. Native American artists with whom Nicholson established long-term business and personal connections included Pomo basket weaver Mary Benson (1878-1930) and her husband William Benson (1862-1937), as well as Elizabeth Hickox (1875-1947) of the Karuk tribe.

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107 Total Pages 79 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Grace Nicholson: Correspondence, William Benson, 1911-1932

Help us transcribe “Grace Nicholson: Correspondence, William Benson, 1911-1932” (Box 262, Folder 6) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. William Benson (Pomo) was a renowned basket maker born in Clear Lake, California. William and his wife Mary Knight Benson (Pomo) found artistic and commercial success weaving traditional Pomo baskets. They traveled widely, exhibiting their baskets, and developing relationships with art collectors, such as Grace Nicholson. Grace Nicholson was an art collector dealer who specialized in Native American and Asian arts and crafts. She moved to California following her parents and grandparents death, in 1901 and was soon purchasing Native American baskets and other artifacts in association with Carrol S. Hartman. Nicholson kept extensive diaries and notes on her buying trips through Native American territory, especially of the Karok, Klamath, and Pomo communities. Her notes included Native American legends, folklore, vocabulary, tribal festivals, basket making, the art trade, and living conditions. Native American artists with whom Nicholson established long-term business and personal connections included Pomo basket weaver Mary Benson (1878-1930) and her husband William Benson (1862-1937), as well as Elizabeth Hickox (1875-1947) of the Karuk tribe.

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82 Total Pages 87 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings, 1928-1968

Help us transcribe “Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings, 1928-1968” (Box 262A, Folder 3) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. Grace Nicholson was an art collector dealer who specialized in Native American and Asian arts and crafts. She moved to California following her parents and grandparents death, in 1901 and was soon purchasing Native American baskets and other artifacts in association with Carrol S. Hartman. Nicholson kept extensive diaries and notes on her buying trips through Native American territory, especially of the Karok, Klamath, and Pomo communities. Her notes included Native American legends, folklore, vocabulary, tribal festivals, basket making, the art trade, and living conditions. Native American artists with whom Nicholson established long-term business and personal connections included Pomo basket weaver Mary Benson (1878-1930) and her husband William Benson (1862-1937), as well as Elizabeth Hickox (1875-1947) of the Karuk tribe. Throughout her collecting career, Nicholson maintained a correspondence with George Heye selling and donating collections to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation from 1916 until her death in 1948. In 1968, Maxwell donated Nicholson's papers and photographs to The Huntington Library and sold Nicholson's collection of baskets made by the Bensons, as well as a large collection of correspondence and myths from William Benson, to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, of New York City (now the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution).

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92 Total Pages 70 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Grace Nicholson: Notes and Photos, 1903-1968

Help us transcribe “Grace Nicholson: Notes and Photos, 1903-1968” (Box 262A, Folder 4) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. This project includes photographs, please review the General Instructions Page for guidance on transcribing images. Grace Nicholson was an art collector dealer who specialized in Native American and Asian arts and crafts. She moved to California following her parents and grandparents death, in 1901 and was soon purchasing Native American baskets and other artifacts in association with Carrol S. Hartman. Nicholson kept extensive diaries and notes on her buying trips through Native American territory, especially of the Karok, Klamath, and Pomo communities. Her notes included Native American legends, folklore, vocabulary, tribal festivals, basket making, the art trade, and living conditions. Native American artists with whom Nicholson established long-term business and personal connections included Pomo basket weaver Mary Benson (1878-1930) and her husband William Benson (1862-1937), as well as Elizabeth Hickox (1875-1947) of the Karuk tribe. Throughout her collecting career, Nicholson maintained a correspondence with George Heye selling and donating collections to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation from 1916 until her death in 1948. In 1968, Maxwell donated Nicholson's papers and photographs to The Huntington Library and sold Nicholson's collection of baskets made by the Bensons, as well as a large collection of correspondence and myths from William Benson, to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, of New York City (now the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution).

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