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16 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

1980 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: AMERICAN TALKERS AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. These log sheets refer to 1980 Festival of American Folklife program.

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47 Total Pages 67 Contributing Members

1980 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES AND FOOD PRESERVATION LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. 1980 Festival presentations included wine making, meat smoking, butter churning, canning, cane syrup making, and "found food" preparation, as well as a daily candy pull and workshops discussing the knowledge and lore of community-based food preservation activities.

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45 Total Pages 33 Contributing Members

1980 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: FINNISH AMERICANS AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class-style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats.

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69 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Deaf Folklore Audio Log Sheets

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed “class style” notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. For Folklore of the Deaf program material, some logs contain information not spoken through the public address system but were in fact signed and interpreted to the visitors in the audience.

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134 Total Pages 105 Contributing Members

1982 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: KOREA AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed “class style” notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. This program celebrated the centenary of diplomatic relations between the United States and Korea, and the equally-long relations between the Smithsonian and Korean scholars. Many of the kinds of traditions the first Smithsonian researchers encountered a century earlier were represented at the 1982 Festival, including musical instrument making, musical performance, pottery making and rituals from the indigenous shamanic religion of Korea. Visitors could also enjoy other venerable traditions including masked dance drama, hemp-cloth and hat making, and the occupational songs of farmers and women divers. Korean Americans presented traditions brought from Korea that have taken root in the American land. More information about the program including participant names can be found in the finding aid here.

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301 Total Pages 112 Contributing Members

1984 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: BLACK EXPRESSIVE CULTURE FROM PHILADELPHIA LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. 1984 Festival presentations included demonstrations of gospel singing, tap dancing, turntable scratching, break dancing, and blues music from Philadelphia.

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236 Total Pages 125 Contributing Members

1985 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: CULTURAL CONSERVATION AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. See the collection's finding aid for participant names and cultural terms. See 1985 Festival of American Folklife Program Book for schedule of events.

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17 Total Pages 30 Contributing Members

Barbeque narrative; Miller, Barrs, Crosby, Joiner; Pattman and Harris

The 1980 Folklife Festival included a program about Community Activities and Food Preservation presented by participants from rural Georgia. Throughout rural America, events known as Homecomings served as a way to pull the community together, and food played a central role in such events. Participants demonstrated and educated visitors on such food preservation techniques as canning, pickling, meat smoking, wine making, and "found food" preparation, among other topics. Help transcribe these Festival recordings to learn more about how food can create community and preserve local tradition. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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17 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Black Expressive Culture Narrative Stage: Arlene Mills Ultrasound; Groove Phi Groove

The 1984 Folklife Festival included a program of black American expressive culture from Philadelphia as part of an initiative to showcase the African Diaspora in America. Black America began its move to the city because of a desperate need for change; as rural southern communities remained too restricting an experience due to racism, economic, social, and political repressions, some people had to leave. In northern cities such as Philadelphia, vibrant black communities took root and thrived. As part of its narrative portion, the programming featured artists, musicians, rappers, and others explaining their craft as well as the cultural roots behind it. The culture of American cities, as presented a the 1984 Philadelphia program, echoed the fact that urban America is also black urban America, a powerful, rich, evolving source of cultural life and creativity. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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22 Total Pages 40 Contributing Members

Black Expressive Culture Narrative Stage: DJ Artistry; The Disco Kings and Queens; The Philadelphia Tap Dancers

The 1984 Folklife Festival included a program of black American expressive culture from Philadelphia as part of an initiative to showcase the African Diaspora in America. Black America began its move to the city because of a desperate need for change; as rural southern communities remained too restricting an experience due to racism, economic, social, and political repressions, some people had to leave. In northern cities such as Philadelphia, vibrant black communities took root and thrived. As part of its narrative portion, the programming featured artists, musicians, rappers, and others explaining their craft as well as the cultural roots behind it. The culture of American cities, as presented a the 1984 Philadelphia program, echoed the fact that urban America is also black urban America, a powerful, rich, evolving source of cultural life and creativity. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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