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16 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Maria Callas portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," the NPG's Lauren Johnson discusses a portrait of Maria Callas by Henry Koerner. In a postwar opera world that needed stars, Maria Callas was said to have "restored the ancient luster to the title of prima donna." Born in New York and raised in Greece, Callas, by sheer force of personality and artistry, rejuvenated the public's interest in this classic music genre. The National Portrait Gallery's Lauren Johnson discussed this 1956 portrait of Callas by Henry Koerner at a Face-to-Face portrait talk. The work is displayed on the museum's third-floor mezzanine, in the exhibition "Bravo!" Recorded at NPG, February 12, 2009. Image info: Maria Callas / Henry Koerner, 1956 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Time magazine / Frame conserved with funds from the Smithsonian Women's Committee. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Maria Callas" by Henry Koerner. NPG.78.TC271]

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10 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Mark Twain portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," Ben Click, Professor at St. Mary's College, discusses a portrait of Mark Twain by John White Alexander. Using the pen name Mark Twain, Samuel Clemens had become one of this country's favorite satiric writers by the early 1870s, routinely making light of everyday human foibles. But it was the publication of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) that assured him a lasting place in American letters. Inspired in part by his own boyhood, these two tales set along the Mississippi River did more than capture the rhythms of youth in antebellum America. In both novels, Clemens examined with sardonic wit various tensions that underlay contemporary society, including, most importantly, the question of race. In later years, his success in this country and abroad was tempered by financial and personal setbacks and by a contempt for American and British imperialism. This portrait of Mark Twain, by John White Alexander, is on view in the "American Origins" exhibition at National Portrait Gallery, on the museum's first floor floor. Recorded at NPG, April 16, 2009. Image info: Samuel Langhorne Clemens / John White Alexander, 1912 or 1913 / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain)" by John White Alexander. NPG.81.116]

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10 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Martha Washington portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," Sid Hart, senior historian at NPG, discusses a portrait of Martha Washington by Gilbert Stuart. Gilbert Stuart painted this portrait of Martha Washington at the same time he did that of the president. Both paintings were commissioned by the Washingtons. They were never completed, however, and the artist kept them in his possession until his death. Although Stuart made many copies of the president's portrait, no other likeness of Martha Washington by Stuart is known to exist. The work is displayed on the museum's second floor, in the exhibition "America's Presidents." Recorded at NPG, March 19, 2009. Image info: Martha Dandridge Custis Washington / Gilbert Stuart, 1796 / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; owned jointly with Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Martha Washington (The Athenaeum Portrait)" by Gilbert Stuart. NPG.80.116]

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4 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Mary Todd Lincoln and Abraham Lincoln portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," Erin Carlson Mast, curator at Lincoln's Cottage, discusses Mary Todd Lincoln. It is difficult to know the character of the Lincolns' relationship. When Lincoln wed Mary Todd in 1842, he married into a well-established Illinois family. Mary was strong-willed, capricious, and adamant. When she eventually showed signs of derangement, her instability colored discussions of her earlier years. Both of Lincoln's secretaries hated her and gained their revenge in their memoirs of the White House years. But from the best evidence, Lincoln was patient with a woman who could be difficult, not least because she suffered terribly at the death of their sons. After Willie died in 1862, she became increasingly fearful and detached, worrying about Lincoln himself, consulting spiritualists, and spending time away from Washington. This small sketch by Pierre Morand, circa 1864, seems to show her departing on such a trip, and the artist has juxtaposed the figures to suggest a gap or tension between them that will never be fully known. The sketch of Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln is displayed on the museum's first floor, in the exhibition "One Life: The Mask of Lincoln." See the online exhibition at: http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/lincoln . Recorded at NPG, March 26, 2009. Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln, c. 1864 / Pierre Morand / Ink and opaque white gouache on paper / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln" by Pierre Morand. NPG.75.28]

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3 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Michael J. Fox portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG curator Ann Schumard discusses a portrait of Michael J. Fox by photographer Steve Pyke. The image is on display in the exhibition "Portraiture Now: Feature Photography." View the online exhibition at: http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/feature . Recorded at NPG, January 29, 2009. Image info: Michael J. Fox / Steve Pyke / Gelatin silver print, 2007 / Collection of the artist, courtesy Flowers Gallery, New York City / Copyright Steve Pyke. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Michael J. Fox" by Steve Pyke. S/NPG.2010.23]

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6 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Octavius V. Catto portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face", NPG historian David Ward discusses a work in the National Portrait Gallery's collection, titled Octavius V. Catto. Octavius V. Catto was an African American teacher, civil rights activist, and organizer of one of America's first baseball leagues. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Octavius Catto" by Broadbent and Phillips. NPG.2006.8] Published March 12, 2008.

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8 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Ornette Coleman portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," Reuben Jackson, archivist at the National Museum of American History, discusses Ornette Coleman. For both his musical virtuosity on alto saxophone and his compositions, Ornette Coleman is one of the major forces in American music in the late twentieth century. Like painter Jackson Pollock and writer Walt Whitman, who rejected traditional forms as too constrictive for human expression, Coleman broke with existing jazz diction, creating a raw sound that seemed to deliberately avoid the musical scale in favor of "playing in the cracks." Reuben Jackson, archivist at the National Museum of American History discussed this portrait of Ornette Coleman by Frederick J. Brown at a Face-to-Face portrait talk. The work is displayed on the museum's third floor, in the exhibition "20th Century Americans." Recorded at NPG, February 19, 2009. Image info: Thelonious Sphere Monk / Boris Chaliapin, 1964 / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, gift of Time magazine. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Ornette Coleman" by Frederick J. Brown. NPG.2006.112]

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4 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Orson Welles portrait

NPG historian Amy Henderson discusses Orson welles and the 70th anniversary of War of the Worlds. On Halloween night of 1938, Orson Welles brought to the airwaves the now-classic H. G. Wells's fantasy War of the Worlds (1898). Many tuned in late, missing the announcement that the program was fiction. As viewers listened to aliens taking over Manhattan, panic set in, and Welles had to interrupt the broadcast to assure listeners it was not real. You can see a portrait of Welles in the "Twentieth-Century Americans" exhibition on the museum's third floor. Recorded at NPG, October 31, 2008. Image info: Orson Welles/Unidentified artist, c.1938 / Gelatin silver print / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Orson Welles" by Unidentified Artist. NPG.2004.159]

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7 Total Pages 32 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Robert Frost portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG historian David Ward discusses a sculpture of Robert Frost. Robert Frost was one of the few modern American poets who combined critical with popular acclaim. His best poetry was written in the 1920s and 1930s, as America was discovering its national and regional histories.This sculpture, by Walker Kirtland Hancock, is on view in the exhibition "20th-Century Americans," on the museum's third floor. Recorded at NPG, September 2008 (uploaded September 29, 2008). Image info: Robert Lee Frost / Walker Kirtland Hancock, 1969 cast after 1950 original / Bronze / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of the artist. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. [“Robert Frost” by Walker Kirtland Hancock. NPG.69.31]

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7 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Ronald Reagan portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," Sid Hart, senior historian at NPG, discusses portrait of Ronald Reagan by Nelson Shanks. When ex-California governor Ronald Reagan began his presidency in 1981, his warmth and skill in handling the media had already planted the seeds of his reputation as the "great communicator." More significant, however, was how those traits were made to work on behalf of his conservative agenda. By the end of his second term, despite widespread concern over budget deficits and several administration scandals, Reagan's presidency had wrought many significant changes. Under his leadership, the nation had undergone major tax reforms, witnessed a significant easing of relations with the Communist world, and experienced a sharp upturn in prosperity. Reagan left office enjoying a popularity that only a few of his outgoing predecessors had ever experienced. This 1989 portrait of Ronald Reagan by Nelson Shanks is on view in the "America's Presidents" exhibition at National Portrait Gallery, on the museum's first floor. Recorded at NPG, April 16, 2009. Image info: Ronald Reagan / Nelson Shanks, 1989 / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of the James Dicke Family / Copyright Nelson Shanks. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Ronald Reagan" by Nelson Shanks. NPG.2007.3]

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