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1 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg letter to Jack Tworkov

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5 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Roberto Matta

Roberto Matta letter to Joseph Cornell

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17 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Selected Documents from the Papers of Painter Alma Thomas

Please help us transcribe these documents from the papers of Washington, D.C. painter Alma Thomas (b. 1891 d. 1978) in the Archives of American Art representing just a fraction of the several thousand letters, writings, notebooks, printed material, photographs, scrapbooks and other formats in this rich collection. Thomas? autobiographical writings provide information on her childhood, her education, her painting and teaching careers, her inspirations for her color paintings and her involvement with Washington, D.C.'s vibrant art community. Notes written by J. Maurice Thomas describe her sister's participation in the 1963 March on Washington. Letters she received reflect her impact on her students, appreciation for her art, and her study abroad.

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180 Total Pages 98 Contributing Members

The Art of Handwriting

Please help us transcribe these letters in the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art. Your transcriptions will be featured in an forthcoming publication, "The Art of Handwriting." In our age of e-mails, texts and tweets, when handwritten letters have ceased to be a primary mode of person-to-person communication, this book will explore what we can learn from the handwriting of artists including Georgia O’Keeffe, Isamu Noguchi, Jackson Pollock, and Thomas Eakins.

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22 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

The Woman's Building Records, "Artists Who are Mothers," 1988-1989

In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Functioning as both an alternative arts education center and public gallery for women, it provided support for women artists. As part of its vision, it focused on the integration of art, the development of women’s experiences, and the women’s movement. The Woman's Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.

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43 Total Pages 71 Contributing Members

The Woman's Building Records, Advertising Campaign, 1979

In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Functioning as both an alternative arts education center and public gallery for women, it provided support for women artists. As part of its vision, it focused on the integration of art, the development of women’s experiences, and the women’s movement. The Woman's Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.

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67 Total Pages 79 Contributing Members

The Woman's Building Records, Advertising in Ms. Magazine, 1976-1980

In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Functioning as both an alternative arts education center and public gallery for women, it provided support for women artists. As part of its vision, it focused on the integration of art, the development of women’s experiences, and the women’s movement. The Woman's Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.

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20 Total Pages 31 Contributing Members

The Woman's Building Records, Advertising in Ms. Magazine, 1980

In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Functioning as both an alternative arts education center and public gallery for women, it provided support for women artists. As part of its vision, it focused on the integration of art, the development of women’s experiences, and the women’s movement. The Woman's Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.

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50 Total Pages 60 Contributing Members

The Woman's Building Records, Advertising, 1985-1986

In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Functioning as both an alternative arts education center and public gallery for women, it provided support for women artists. As part of its vision, it focused on the integration of art, the development of women’s experiences, and the women’s movement. The Woman's Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.

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