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73 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

Nina Howell Starr Papers, Correspondence between Minnie Evans and Nina Starr, 1967

Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975. Help transcribe correspondence between Evans and Starr to learn more about their lives and legacies.

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24 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Notes for Yasuo Kuniyoshi's Autobiography

Celebrate Asian Pacific Heritage Month by transcribing Yasuo Kuniyoshi's notes for his unpublished autobiography. Kuniyoshi, a painter, printmaker, and photographer, was born in Okayama, Japan in 1889. He came to the United States in 1906, and lived and worked first in Los Angeles and then in New York after 1910. Kuniyoshi was active in social organizations, especially Japanese American organizations, such as the Japanese American Committee for Democracy, and took an active role in the war effort during World War II. The fully digitized Yasuo Kuniyoshi Papersare available on the Archives of American Art website.

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27 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Olive Rush Diary Fragments, circa 1890-1907

Olive Rush (1873-1966) was an illustrator, painter, and sought-after muralist. A Quaker born in Indiana, she eventually moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she worked with young pueblo artists during the 1930s. Her work there has been credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations.
But long before that, Olive Rush gained early recognition for her own talent while completing her art studies. Some of these diary fragments, dated 1890 to 1907, reflect on her childhood.

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46 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Olive Rush Diary, 1886

Olive Rush (1873-1966) was an illustrator, painter, and sought-after muralist. A Quaker born in Indiana, she eventually moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she worked with young pueblo artists during the 1930s. Her work there has been credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations.
But long before that, Olive Rush gained early recognition for her own talent while completing her art studies. This diary, dated 1886, was written when Ollie Rush was just 13, and struggling to understand her lessons and go sledding in the deep snow of Indiana winters.

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48 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

Olive Rush Diary, 1890

Olive Rush (1873-1966) was an illustrator, painter, and sought-after muralist. A Quaker born in Indiana, she eventually moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she worked with young pueblo artists during the 1930s. Her work there has been credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations.
But long before that, Olive Rush gained early recognition for her own talent while completing her art studies. This diary, dated 1890, was written when Olive Rush was 17, taking the wrong train, and beginning her studies at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, DC.

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4 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Philip Guston

Philip Guston letter to Elise Asher

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20 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Photographs of Olive Rush and Native American Artists Painting Frescoes, from the Olive Rush Papers

Illustrator, muralist, and art educator Olive Rush was born in Indiana in 1875. After several visits and exhibitions in New Mexico, Rush moved permanently to Santa Fe in 1920. She established a studio and home in an adobe house on Canyon Road, which became a main thoroughfare of the Santa Fe artists' community. Rush's enthusiastic work in the 1930s with the young Pueblo artists is credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico. Rush continued to work with Native American artists throughout her life, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations, including Harrison Begay, Awa-Tsireh, Pop Chalee, Pablita Valerde, and Ha-So-De (Narciso Abeyta). Help transcribe the identifications and notes on the backs of photographs of Olive Rush working with Native American artists on frescoes at Maisel's Indian Trading Post, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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32 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Primer Curso de Caricatura by Abril Lamarque

Celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month by transcribing and exploring the book Primer Curso de Caricatura by Abril Lamarque. Lamarque was a Cuban-born graphic designer, illustrator, caricaturist, cartoonist, art director, and amateur magician. He is credited with creating in the early 1920s the first Spanish language comic strip that was not translated from English, Monquito. Monquito is featured in this 1925 instructional book. Transcribe the Spanish text and learn from the master of caricatures himself- Abril Larmarque!

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36 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Records of Artwork by Native American Artists, from the Olive Rush Papers

Illustrator, muralist, and art educator Olive Rush was born in Indiana in 1875. After several visits and exhibitions in New Mexico, Rush moved permanently to Santa Fe in 1920. She established a studio and home in an adobe house on Canyon Road, which became a main thoroughfare of the Santa Fe artists' community. Rush's enthusiastic work in the 1930s with the young Pueblo artists is credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico. Rush continued to work with Native American artists throughout her life, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations, including Harrison Begay, Awa-Tsireh, Pop Chalee, Pablita Valerde, and Ha-So-De (Narciso Abeyta). Help transcribe the records Olive Rush kept on the Native American artists she promoted. The records include the names of artists and artworks, price lists, and exhibition records.

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21 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Reuben Tam Diary (Loose Pages), 1938

Join the Archives of American Art during May in celebrating Asian Pacific American Heritage Month! This month we’re featuring the 1930s and early 1940s diaries of Reuben Tam, who was known as an abstract landscape painter. Take a look at loose pages chronicling his days in 1938.

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