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98 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Diaries: Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney's Journal, Vol. II, 1890 September-December

Celebrate Women's History month by transcribing one of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney's journals. Whitney was a sculptor, art patron, writer, and the founder of the Whitney Museum of Art. She began keeping diaries as a child, and maintained the habit into her adulthood. Whitney wrote this diary from September through December of 1980. This, and her other diaries, and extensive material which documents her life and career are fully digitized and available through the Gertude Vanderbilt Whitney Papers on the Archives of American Art website.

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128 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

Diaries: Palmer C. Hayden's Diaries, 1938-1940

Celebrate Black History Month by transcribing the diaries of Palmer C. Hayden, an African American painter from New York, New York. These notebooks document Hayden's every day life through short daily entries. Hayden was among the first African American artists to use African-American subjects and designs in his painting.
View the rest of Palmer C. Hayden's diaries in his fully digitized papers on the Archives of American Art website.

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45 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

Diaries: Reuben Tam's 1941-1942 Diary

Celebrate Asian Pacific Heritage Month by transcribing one of Reuben Tam's diaries. Landscape painter and educator Reuben Tam was born in Kapaa, Hawaii in 1916. This diary, written from 1941 to 1942, documents his time living in New York studying philosophy and art history at the New School for Social Research and Columbia University. The fully digitized Reuben Tam Papers, which contain more of Tam's diaries, are available on the Archives of American Art website.

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201 Total Pages 85 Contributing Members

Diary of Cecilia Beaux

CECILIA BEAUX (1855–1942) PORTRAITIST

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141 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

Documents from the Lucy R. Lippard Papers

Please help us transcribe these documents form the papers of New York writer, art critic, curator, and teacher, Lucy R. Lippard (b. 1937) in the Archives of American Art. These documents represent archival materials from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Her collections includes reviews, letters, postcards, manuscripts, questionnaires, notes, announcements, mail art, business cards, and exhibition pamphlets which document Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism, and political activism. The items found in this project represent all the items in the collection with the potential to be transcribed. To learn more about Lucy Lippard, visit the finding aid of her collection at the Archives of American Art. Or visit her oral history interview for more details.

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Subprojects

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Dorothea Lange

Dorothea Lange letter to Ben Shahn

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360 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Dove Diaries, 1933-34

These are the diaries of Arthur and Helen Torr Dove. Arthur Garfield Dove was an early twentieth-century painter, collagist, and illustrator who was one of the first American artists to embrace abstraction in art. He was a part of Alfred Stieglitz's Circle of modern American artists introduced at Stieglitz's 291 Gallery along with John Marin and Georgia O'Keeffe. Dove spent his career developing his own idiosyncratic style of formal abstraction in painting based on his ideas about nature, feeling, and pure form, and characterized by experimentation with color, composition, and materials. Around 1920, Dove met an artist named Helen S. Torr, also known as Reds. She was a Philadelphia-born painter who had studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art. Torr and Dove eventually left their unhappy first marriages and began a life together, moving to a houseboat docked in Manhattan. In 1922, they moved to Halesite, Long Island, New York, where Dove's artwork once again flourished. By the mid-1920s, he was exhibiting regularly, paralleled by the rise of Stieglitz's new Intimate Gallery in 1925. His work continued to explore abstraction and organic forms, and, in addition to paintings, he produced assemblages made of found materials. Learn more about their life and work in the finding aid for the Arthur and Helen Torr Dove papers. Help us make these handwritten diaries more legible and searchable.

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370 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

Dove Diaries, 1936-7

These are the diaries of Arthur and Helen Torr Dove. Arthur Garfield Dove was an early twentieth-century painter, collagist, and illustrator who was one of the first American artists to embrace abstraction in art. He was a part of Alfred Stieglitz's Circle of modern American artists introduced at Stieglitz's 291 Gallery along with John Marin and Georgia O'Keeffe. Dove spent his career developing his own idiosyncratic style of formal abstraction in painting based on his ideas about nature, feeling, and pure form, and characterized by experimentation with color, composition, and materials. Around 1920, Dove met an artist named Helen S. Torr, also known as Reds. She was a Philadelphia-born painter who had studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art. Torr and Dove eventually left their unhappy first marriages and began a life together, moving to a houseboat docked in Manhattan. In 1922, they moved to Halesite, Long Island, New York, where Dove's artwork once again flourished. By the mid-1920s, he was exhibiting regularly, paralleled by the rise of Stieglitz's new Intimate Gallery in 1925. His work continued to explore abstraction and organic forms, and, in addition to paintings, he produced assemblages made of found materials. Learn more about their life and work in the finding aid for the Arthur and Helen Torr Dove papers. Help us make these handwritten diaries more legible and searchable.

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328 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

Dove Diaries, 1938-9

These are the diaries of Arthur and Helen Torr Dove. Arthur Garfield Dove was an early twentieth-century painter, collagist, and illustrator who was one of the first American artists to embrace abstraction in art. He was a part of Alfred Stieglitz's Circle of modern American artists introduced at Stieglitz's 291 Gallery along with John Marin and Georgia O'Keeffe. Dove spent his career developing his own idiosyncratic style of formal abstraction in painting based on his ideas about nature, feeling, and pure form, and characterized by experimentation with color, composition, and materials. Around 1920, Dove met an artist named Helen S. Torr, also known as Reds. She was a Philadelphia-born painter who had studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art. Torr and Dove eventually left their unhappy first marriages and began a life together, moving to a houseboat docked in Manhattan. In 1922, they moved to Halesite, Long Island, New York, where Dove's artwork once again flourished. By the mid-1920s, he was exhibiting regularly, paralleled by the rise of Stieglitz's new Intimate Gallery in 1925. His work continued to explore abstraction and organic forms, and, in addition to paintings, he produced assemblages made of found materials. Learn more about their life and work in the finding aid for the Arthur and Helen Torr Dove papers. Help us make these handwritten diaries more legible and searchable.

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472 Total Pages 42 Contributing Members

Dove Diaries, 1942-3

These are the diaries of Arthur and Helen Torr Dove. Arthur Garfield Dove was an early twentieth-century painter, collagist, and illustrator who was one of the first American artists to embrace abstraction in art. He was a part of Alfred Stieglitz's Circle of modern American artists introduced at Stieglitz's 291 Gallery along with John Marin and Georgia O'Keeffe. Dove spent his career developing his own idiosyncratic style of formal abstraction in painting based on his ideas about nature, feeling, and pure form, and characterized by experimentation with color, composition, and materials. Around 1920, Dove met an artist named Helen S. Torr, also known as Reds. She was a Philadelphia-born painter who had studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art. Torr and Dove eventually left their unhappy first marriages and began a life together, moving to a houseboat docked in Manhattan. In 1922, they moved to Halesite, Long Island, New York, where Dove's artwork once again flourished. By the mid-1920s, he was exhibiting regularly, paralleled by the rise of Stieglitz's new Intimate Gallery in 1925. His work continued to explore abstraction and organic forms, and, in addition to paintings, he produced assemblages made of found materials. Learn more about their life and work in the finding aid for the Arthur and Helen Torr Dove papers. Help us make these handwritten diaries more legible and searchable.

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