Browse Projects

Prevnext

100% Complete

22 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Field Notes, October 1911

Do you remember the excitement of your first job? Relive it with Alexander Wetmore's field notes from October 1911. This collection of notes were taken shortly after Wetmore began his first job, working for the US Department of Agriculture's Biological Survey bureau, and includes bird counts and observations taken during his collecting trips. Wetmore would go on to have a long career in science, and serve as Smithsonian Secretary from 1945-1952. Join us in transcribing this set of field notes and make Wetmore's observations available for scientists today.

Go

100% Complete

18 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Monthly Bird Lists, June 1902-February 1903

Do you remember what your favorite hobby was as a 17 year-old? Is it something you still enjoy today? For future Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore, his passion as a teen carried on to adulthood--birds. Wetmore, an ornithologist and curator, kept this monthly set of bird observations as a teenager in his hometown of North Freedom, Wisconsin. Wetmore would go on to research birds for the rest of his long and vibrant scientific career! Help our other volunteers to transcribe this set of ornithology records and make a young Wetmore's scientific exploration available for generations of new researchers.

Go

100% Complete

64 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Monthly Bird Lists, June 1902-January 1905

How do you think the wildlife found in a small town compares to that of a big city? How about the native bird population? Find out with future Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's monthly bird lists from 1902-1905. During this time, Wetmore traveled from his small hometown in Wisconsin to college, in the city of Independence, Kansas--making observations about the local birdlife in the process. Wetmore would go on to have a decades-long ornithology career with the Smithsonian. Explore Wetmore's college field notes and help other digital volunteers transcribe his observations!

Go

100% Complete

46 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - North Carolina, 1917: To Investigate Damage to Farm Crops

How much harm could a mourning dove do to a farmer's crops? in June 1917, naturalist Alexander Wetmore was sent to investigate claims that these birds were doing exactly that in response to a complaint from Mr. J. F. Hunter in North Carolina. The materials begin with a small notebook where Wetmore recorded his trip expenses, then proceeds with a thorough report of his observation and conclusions. Join us to transcribe this material and learn how the United States Department of Agriculture worked with farmers at a time when the nation was beginning to send troops into World War I.

Go

100% Complete

87 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Panama, Costa Rica and Guatemala, 1940; Panama, 1944

How did Alexander Wetmore, ornithologist, curator, and former Secretary of the Smithsonian, spend his Thanksgiving 75 years ago? Exploring the volcanoes, vivid landscapes, and unique wildlife of Panama, Guatemala, and Costa Rica! Take a break from the turkey and whet your appetite for adventure with Wetmore's photo album, which features fascinating images from his expeditions in 1940 and 1944. Join us in transcribing the image captions in Wetmore's album and get a new look into the specimen collecting process as he experienced it.

Go

100% Complete

128 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Photo Album, 1914-1920

Have you ever wondered what kinds of birds live in different regions of the United States? Travel the country and find out with Alexander Wetmore, ornithologist, curator, and former Secretary of the Smithsonian, and his 1914-1920 photo album. This unique collection of images were taken while Wetmore traveled the country with the United States Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Biological Survey. The photos give insight into Wetmore's explorations of Utah, California, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Florida, South Carolina, Minnesota and North Dakota. Join us in transcribing the image captions in Wetmore's album and get a new look into US wildlife!

Go

100% Complete

51 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Photo Album, Africa, 1957

Did you know that 400 different bird species live in Hwange National Park--established in 1928 and currently the largest game reserve in Zimbabwe? That makes Hwange the perfect place to study for a scientist like Alexander Wetmore! Wetmore, an ornithologist and former Smithsonian Secretary, visited Hwange (then called Wankie Game Reserve) during his 1957 trip to Africa. This album documents Wetmore's trip through Zimbabwe, as well as other animal reserves like Kruger National Park. Wetmore's journey though Africa was taken just five years after Wetmore retired as Secretary and became a Smithsonian Research Associate--continuing his ornithology research around the world! Travel through Africa with Wetmore and help other volunteers to help transcribe these image captions!

Go

100% Complete

56 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Photo Album, Bonaire and Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, 1969

The Bonaire Islands are famous for one particular type of bird--the Caribbean flamingo. The Islands are one of only four nesting grounds for the species. What other birds make their home on the island's shores? Find out with ornithologist and former Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's 1969 photo album. Wetmore traveled to the Netherlands Antilles with his wife, Beatrice, and studied the islands' coastlines and interiors (including photographing cave drawings!). Find a few flamingos in this fascinating album and help transcribe image captions!

Go

100% Complete

100 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Photo Album, Colombia, Curacao, Venezuela, and Bermuda, 1941

Have you ever wondered what kinds of wildlife live on the thousands of miles of Caribbean coastline? So did ornithologist and future Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore. In 1941, Wetmore traveled through Colombia, Curacao, Venezuela, and Bermuda to collect specimens for the US National Museum (now the National Museum of Natural History). The photos Wetmore took of his expedition trip document the vast countries he explored--from farms and port towns to villages, with candid photos of local men and women's daily lives. Join other volunteers on a Wetmore expedition and help transcribe the image captions from this album!

Go

100% Complete

72 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Photo Album, Curacao and Venezuela, 1954

If you were planning a research expedition to Venezuela, how would you prefer to travel? Former Smithsonian Secretary and ornithologist Alexander Wetmore took to the air and sea to explore Venezuela and the island of Curacao in 1954. This album documents Wetmore's research exploration of the region--from boating down the coastline, to incredible aerial photographs taken from a Catalina plane. Go exploring with Wetmore and other scientists studying the region (including the husband-and-wife botany team of William and Katherine Phelps). Help transcribe the image captions from this album and make Wetmore's research newly discoverable for present-day scientists! You can also view images from the first half of Wetmore's 1954 trip in Volume 1 of the Venezuela travel albums. (Formatting Note: No need to describe image placement on the page! Please use [[image]] on the first line to indicate a photo, followed by a second line with the caption, and a third with the date.)

Go

Pages