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45 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Photo Album, Venezuela, 1952

In 1948, representatives from governments across the globe joined conservation organizations to create the International Union for the Protection of Nature (now the International Union of Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources). The goal of the IUPN was to help encourage international cooperation in protecting and sharing data about nature and wildlife. And who better to help with that mission than ornithologist and former Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore? This photo album documents Wetmore's trip to the IUPN conference in 1952. The conference took place in Caracas, the largest city in Venezuela, and the album includes photos from the area and a nearby bird habitat. Join other volunteers in helping transcribe the image captions from this album!

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58 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Photo Album, Venezuela, 1954

If you wanted to conduct a study on the wildlife of Venezuela, where would you start? Former Smithsonian Secretary and ornithologist Alexander Wetmore's field exploration began with the Amazonas territory--a state in Venezuela that covers nearly a fifth of the country's area, but with only one percent of its population. This album depicts Wetmore's trip through the Amazonas territory and its vast natural resources--including its many rivers, caves, and summits. Explore Venezuela's rich environment with Alexander Wetmore and help transcribe the image captions from his album! (Formatting Note: No need to describe image placement on the page! Please use [[image]] on the first line to indicate a photo, followed by a second line with the caption, and a third with the date.)

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3 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Report, November 1905

When you were a student, did your teachers ever find your homework "exceedingly interesting"? Future Secretary of the Smithsonian Alexander Wetmore's professor sure did! Wetmore wrote this report about the spring bird migration in Southern Kansas for his (9 a.m.!) College Rhetoric class at the University of Kansas in 1905. Wetmore, a freshman at the time, received an "exceedingly interesting" as his grade. Wetmore later went on to have an exceedingly interesting career as an ornithologist and curator, observing birds for decades to come. Join us in transcribing this report and make a young Wetmore's scientific exploration available for generations of new researchers.

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151 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Western United States, 1918

What happens to the land when flocks of migrating birds pass through? In 1918, migrating ducks were a source of great concern to farmers in the western United States, particularly rice farmers. The reports and correspondence in ornithologist Alexander Wetmore's field journal capture the tension between agricultural interests and wildlife protection in different parts of the country. Initially with the Bureau of Biological Survey and later Secretary of the Smithsonian, Alexander Wetmore (1886-1978) and others spent considerable effort to explore and analyze the issue. Join other volunpeers in transcribing this material for a close look at discussions and first-hand discoveries being made in 1918.

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138 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Western United States, 1918 : Correspondence, field reports, and reference materials (1 of 2)

In 1918, farmers were frustrated by the damage migrating birds were causing to their crops. With the August harvest time quickly approaching, farmers across the Southwest, California and Washington were feeling an increasing urgency to protect their crops. No one wanted to lose acres of their harvest to birds, especially ducks. With the United States engaged in World War I, licensing for the purchase, transfer and use of explosives was tightly regulated. The use of "duck bombs" seemed like a promising deterrent. Alexander Wetmore of the Bureau of Biological Survey, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), gathered the information in this field book while on assignment for the Bureau. It includes newspaper clippings, documents of public opinion about farmers' use of explosives, correspondence with the California Board of Fish and Game and USDA officials, and a report on the lake area of the Chusca Mountains. Join other volunpeers in transcribing another of Wetmore's field books about the contentious relationship between migrating birds and American farmers.

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114 Total Pages 62 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Western United States, 1918: Breeding waterfowl, field diaries

Following his time in southern Texas and Arkansas, ornithologist Alexander Wetmore moves on to spend four months, from late spring to the very end of summer, observing waterfowl breeding in the southwestern United States. Nonetheless, the contentious relationship between migrating birds and farmers through out the Southwest continues to crop up in his notes. This field diary includes wonderfully detailed descriptions and sketches of birds' mating rituals that Wetmore observed interspersed with terse notes about the farmers. One "wants government to send in soldiers to kill off ducks." Another farmer wants the privilege of doing it himself. This field diary proves to be a real transcription challenge because Wetmore's penciled notes are in some places both faint and smudged. Are you up to it? Join other stalwart #volunpeers in this effort.

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39 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore- Alaska, 1911

Collection expeditions are important to supporting the conservation of birds and mammals, but did you know that wildlife practices have an economic impact, too? That's one of many angles that Alexander Wetmore investigated in this collection of personal notes from Alaska, 1911. Together with photos and expense reports are Wetmore's personal notes about fox farming, fur trading, and other wildlife practices, which he presented to the Division of Economic Investigations. Join other digital volunteers to transcribe this field book and get a new perspective on wildlife expeditions.

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83 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore- Field Notes, April-June 1903

What were you most passionate about when you were a teenager? Is it something that you enjoy just as much now? In 1903, when future Secretary of the Smithsonian Alexander Wetmore was just 17, his passion was the same as it was in his adulthood—birds. Wetmore, an ornithologist and curator, kept this set of handwritten notes as a young man, tracking the migration patterns and activity of birds in his native Wisconsin. Wetmore would go on to research birds for the rest of his long and vibrant scientific career. In celebration of International Migratory Bird Day, help our digital volunteers transcribe Wetmore’s migration observations!

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113 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore- Field Notes, August 1902-April 1903

When future Secretary of the Smithsonian Alexander Wetmore was a teenager, his interests weren’t just flights of fancy. They laid the groundwork for his long and successful scientific career as an ornithologist and curator. Wetmore began studying birds at a young age, and continued through his adulthood with the Smithsonian! He recorded this set of field notes when he was just 16—many years later, Wetmore would continue his ornithological field observations. Join us in transcribing this set of field notes and make a young Wetmore’s scientific exploration available for generations of new researchers!

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