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40% Complete

110 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Annie Jump Cannon 21

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Annie Jump Cannon, who in 1901 devised a robust and elegant stellar classification scheme that astronomers still use today. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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47% Complete

226 Total Pages 32 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Cecilia H. Payne #10

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the early work of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, who discovered that stars, and the whole universe, were made abundantly of hydrogen -- a discovery that earned her the first PhD in Astronomy from Harvard. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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75% Complete

113 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Henrietta Swan Leavitt #13

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Henrietta Swan Leavitt, who connected the luminosity and periodicity of certain variable stars such that we were able to understand just how big our universe is. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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98% Complete

506 Total Pages 57 Contributing Members

Smithsonian-Bredin Caribbean Expedition, 1956

How much could you accomplish in 40 days and 40 nights? In the second Caribbean expedition sponsored by philanthropist J. Bruce Bredin, Waldo L. Schmitt and four others covered 1,000 miles aboard a yacht named Freelance. This served as their floating laboratory as they took samples, collected specimens and made observations at twenty-eight islands and 15 moorings. They brought back over 50,000 specimens and samples along with species distribution data. Join us and other volunteers in transcribing the diaries, logs and visual records of this expedition.

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69% Complete

76 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Report - Department of Birds - Eggs: Annual Reports 1891 - 1896

There are unconfirmed stories about the lengths to which U.S. Army officer and later honorary curator Charles Bendire had gone in his avocation as a soldier-ornithologist. One such story has him collecting birds eggs from a nest while under fire from Apache Indians. Putting aside these tales, his skill as an ornithologist and oologist was highly regarded by professional ornithologists like Robert Ridgway, Chief Curator of the United States National Museum's Division of Birds. Please help us transcribe Bendire's annual reports of the work in the Oology (eggs) section from the years 1891 - 1896.

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78% Complete

38 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

Vernon Bailey - Field notes, Montana and Idaho, June 23-September 8, 1911

How often do you have to visit a place before you begin to notice it changing? By 1911, the Bureau of Biological Survey had been working on a comprehensive survey of North America flora and fauna for over a decade. Chief naturalist Vernon Orlando Bailey's first survey of Montana had been in 1894, fifteen years earlier. Join our volunpeers and transcribe his lists of the plants and animals he collected and observed during this 1911 trip, starting at the very first leg of his journey!

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33% Complete

99 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Yamada Diary

Help us transcribe this WWII Japanese diary. At the end of World War II, an unknown United States Marine brought home several Japanese-language items. These items were subsequently sold and the purchaser's son later donated them to the National Air and Space Museum. In 2003 and 2004, Museum volunteers, Mr. Koji Hayama and Mr. Tom Momiyama, translated parts of the material and they believe that they were created by a Mr. Yamada, who was probably part of an aircraft ground crew with occasional flight duties, and served in Manchuria, Korea, Burma, and the Philippines. Transcriptions of this diary will help National Air and Space Museum curators as they begin research for new exhibits. Please note that this diary is written in Japanese, and requires access to a Japanese keyboard, and basic knowledge of the language, for transcription. NASM staff are also interested in any translations that can be provided of the diary's contents. Please separate any translations by including them below the transcriptions for each page, and by indicating the translation with brackets. For example: [[translation]] text here [[/translation]]. Please reach out with any questions.

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