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61% Complete

86 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Davray, Jean, 1951-1968

Letters from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world's foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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20% Complete

213 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Charlotte, Letters Received from the Asst. Comm., Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.3: Subordinate Field Offices: Charlotte (Subassistant Commissioner). Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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46% Complete

751 Total Pages 61 Contributing Members

Martin Moynihan - Atlapetes (Brush-finches) - Panama, Ecuador and Peru, 1958, 1960-1962

Understanding biodiversity trends and the factors that influence them requires us first to develop an intimate knowledge about the species themselves. In these field notes, Dr. Martin Moynihan (1928-1996) documents his work studying brush-finches (atlapetes) in Panama, Ecuador and Peru. Over half a century later, ornithologists are still making discoveries, such as the Antioquia Brush-finch that was identified from museum specimens collected in 1971. It was not seen alive for the next 47 years until it was rediscovered in Colombia 2018. Join in with other digital volunteers to transcribe Dr. Moynihan's observations and make them more accessible for today's researchers.

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9% Complete

86 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Charlotte, Register of Letters Received, Vol. (72), July 1867–Dec. 1868

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.3: Subordinate Field Offices: Charlotte (Subassistant Commissioner). Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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89% Complete

2,096 Total Pages 174 Contributing Members

Women's History at the Archives of American Art

Celebrate the history of women artists and art historians by exploring and transcribing archival collections from the Archives of American Art. Through diaries, notebooks, essays, and correspondence, learn about the life and careers of painters, sculptors, writers, critics, art historians, and other creative women who made their mark on American history.
In January 2020, we're featuring travel diaries from the papers of artist, teacher and gallery director Anna Walinska (1906-1997).

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Subprojects

41% Complete

104 Total Pages 32 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Annie Jump Cannon 32

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Annie Jump Cannon, who in 1901 devised a robust and elegant stellar classification scheme that astronomers still use today. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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90% Complete

11 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Dawson, John W., 1926

Letters from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world's foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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55% Complete

105 Total Pages 59 Contributing Members

Thomas DeWitt Milling Collection - Clippings

Thomas DeWitt Milling contributed mightily to the American heritage of flight. Possessor of the Aero Club of America's License 30, Expert Aviator License 3 and numerous awards and honors, Milling became a key figure in the early years of aviation. His illustrious career in both civil and military spheres garnered widespread acclaim.

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39% Complete

226 Total Pages 134 Contributing Members

Friedrich "Fritz" Rumpf Notebooks - Set 2

Friedrich Karl Georg Rumpf (1888-1949) German illustrator and ethnographer, and son of German artist Fritz Rumpf. The younger Fritz Rumpf was living in Japan at the outbreak of war and likely composed parts of at least one of the following notebooks while living as a prisoner of war. PLEASE NOTE: The notebooks will be a special challenge as they contain multiple notes in German and Japanese, and drawings in pencil, ink and wash made during his travels and research in Japan.

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47% Complete

17 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Fred Howard Vin Fiz Special Papers - Train Registration Tables

The first crossing of the United States by airplane was achieved by Calbraith Perry Rodgers in 1911 in his Wright EX biplane, named the Vin Fiz. Rodgers decided to attempt the coast-to-coast flight in response to publisher William Randolph Hearst's New York American challenge which offered a prize of $50,000 for the first transcontinental flight to be competed in 30 days. Rodgers began his journey from Sheepshead Bay, New York, on September 17, 1911, and as the flight was punctuated by numerous stops, delays, and accidents the 30-day time limit Hearst imposed for the prize had expired before Rodgers reached California on November 5, 1911. To finance the trip, Rodgers had secured backing from the Armour Company, a Chicago firm which was then introducing a new grape-flavored soft drink called Vin Fiz. Armour provided Rodgers with a special train, called the Vin Fiz Special, with cars for the accommodation of Rodgers' family and his support crew, and a "hangar" car, which was a rolling workshop, filled with spare parts to repair and maintain the airplane over the course of the flight. There was even an automobile on board to pick up Rodgers after forced landings away from the rail line. Fred Howard, the division passenger agent for the Erie Railroad, was placed in charge of the Vin Fiz Special and soon also took charge of the command center, juggling both railroad matters and aviation repairs. In Chicago, Howard was commended for his effort and asked to continue with the flight to California, but he declined. Note: Please do not describe any images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project.

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