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40% Complete

25 Total Pages 22 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Office of the Assistant Commissioner, Other Records, Unidentified Name Indexes, Volume 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 2.2: Office of the Assistant Commissioner: Other Records. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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15% Complete

65 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Offices of Staff Officers, Chief Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer, Letters Sent, Volume (61)

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 3.3: Offices of Staff Officers: Chief Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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22% Complete

1,192 Total Pages 42 Contributing Members

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS? SET 11B

Come help us improve our digital records for the United States National Herbarium (US)! Please join us in our effort to transcribe the locality information for our difficult to decipher US Specimens. The records in this project are special cases in which the locality information requires some detective work. We'd like to ask for your help in digging a little deeper to find the Country and Territory/State/Province for each of these specimens sheets labels; see special instructions and examples here . Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions. Note: Do not erase notes from other volunteers or staff; rather, leave existing comments and add your own.

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28% Complete

81 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

Cleofé Calderón - Brasil 1979, Amazonia #3

The sheer number of specimens agrostologist Cleofé Calderón collected for the Smithsonian, evidenced in this 1979 notebook, make it hard to believe that in just a few years, Calderón completely retired from botany. She remained in Washington after stepping away from the U.S. National Herbarium in 1985, but rarely returned to the Smithsonian, especially after her longtime professional partner Dr. Tom Soderstrom passed away in 1987. After breaking from the field, Calderón worked at a bibliographic service before retiring and returning to Argentina in 2005. Just two years later, she passed away. Your assistance in transcribing this project will ensure that Cleofé Calderón’s important work will not be forgotten. Calderón's handwriting can be a little difficult to read, so feel free to see how volunpeers have transcribed her work.

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55% Complete

38 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Henrietta Swan Leavitt #18

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Henrietta Swan Leavitt, who connected the luminosity and periodicity of certain variable stars such that we were able to understand just how big our universe is. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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23% Complete

51 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

USNM - Curators Annual Reports - Department of Fishes: Annual Report, 1888-1889

You have to really trust your siblings enough to leave them with your life’s work. You may be familiar with ichthyologist Tarleton H. Bean, but what about his younger brother, Barton A. Bean? In this 1889 curators’ annual report, head of the U.S. National Museum’s Division of Fishes Tarleton H. Bean had to step away for months, leaving his brother in charge. The younger Bean first came to the Museum in 1881 as a clerk and was promoted to assistant curator, a position he held from 1890 until his retirement in 1932. Dive in with a group of volunpeers to read about the new accessions and publications that year, and how Bean managed the collection in his brother’s absence.

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84% Complete

146 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

Judy Gradwohl - Field notes, 1978-1979

Judy Gradwohl has an impressive resume with the Smithsonian. She has been an exhibition curator, an environmental policy specialist, and even a digital content developer, helping to create the Smithsonian’s first website. But first, she was an ornithologist. In the late 1970s, Gradwohl studied social and foraging behavior of tropical forest birds at Smithsonian’s Tropical Research Institute in Panama. She and her husband, ornithologist Russell Greenberg, co-wrote "Saving the Tropical Forests." Today, she serves as the president and CEO of the San Diego National History Museum. Join us in celebrating World Migratory Bird Day, by helping to describe Gradwohl’s early field notes.

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91% Complete

155 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection - Individual Flight Record - Davis, Benjamin O. 1206-A. (2)

Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr. was born in Washington, DC on December 18, 1912. He attended Western Reserve University and the University of Chicago before gaining admission to the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. He graduated in the Class of 1936 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry. After serving in the infantry for several years Davis was posted to the newly-established Tuskegee Army Air Field, AL for pilot training in 1942. He commanded the 99th Fighter Squadron, the first unit of “Tuskegee Airmen.” Two units of Tuskegee Airmen saw combat during World War II: the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332d Fighter Group. Davis, promoted to Colonel in 1944, commanded both of these units in turn, leading the 99th and 332d in combat in Europe and earning the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Legion of Merit, and Silver Star for his own actions and a Distinguished Unit Citation for the 332d Fighter Group. Davis was responsible for the success of the 477th, as he quickly brought the unit up to deployment requirements, in spite of racial tensions that had previously left the unit lacking training. The performance of the units under Davis' command had laid to rest questions regarding the abilities of the "negro race" and in 1948 the Air Force determined that the efficient use of its manpower required the integration of its units. As a result the Air Force rapidly complied with President Truman's order for the integration of the United States military. The integration procedure, however, resulted in the deactivation of Davis' command as its personnel were dispersed among the rest of the Air Force; Davis himself was assigned to attend classes at the Air War College at Maxwell AFB, AL. After completing the course of study at the Air War College, Davis was posted to a variety of command and staff positions both within the United States and abroad. Davis was promoted to Brigadier General in October 1954, after ten years as a Colonel. He was promoted to Major General in June 1959 and to Lieutenant General in April 1965. Despite persistent rumors of his impending promotion to full General, no such promotion was pending by the time of his retirement on January 31, 1970. On December 9, 1998, Davis was promoted to General on the Retired List, receiving his fourth star from President William Clinton in a ceremony held in the Presidential Hall of the Old Executive Office Building in Washington, DC. The promotion came only after the Tuskegee Airmen approached Senator John McCain of Arizona, who agreed that the promotion was warranted by Davis' service.

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75% Complete

275 Total Pages 46 Contributing Members

Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection - Individual Flight Record - Davis, Benjamin O. 1206-A. (1)

Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr. was born in Washington, DC on December 18, 1912. He attended Western Reserve University and the University of Chicago before gaining admission to the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. He graduated in the Class of 1936 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry. After serving in the infantry for several years Davis was posted to the newly-established Tuskegee Army Air Field, AL for pilot training in 1942. He commanded the 99th Fighter Squadron, the first unit of “Tuskegee Airmen.” Two units of Tuskegee Airmen saw combat during World War II: the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332d Fighter Group. Davis, promoted to Colonel in 1944, commanded both of these units in turn, leading the 99th and 332d in combat in Europe and earning the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Legion of Merit, and Silver Star for his own actions and a Distinguished Unit Citation for the 332d Fighter Group. Davis was responsible for the success of the 477th, as he quickly brought the unit up to deployment requirements, in spite of racial tensions that had previously left the unit lacking training. The performance of the units under Davis' command had laid to rest questions regarding the abilities of the "negro race" and in 1948 the Air Force determined that the efficient use of its manpower required the integration of its units. As a result the Air Force rapidly complied with President Truman's order for the integration of the United States military. The integration procedure, however, resulted in the deactivation of Davis' command as its personnel were dispersed among the rest of the Air Force; Davis himself was assigned to attend classes at the Air War College at Maxwell AFB, AL. After completing the course of study at the Air War College, Davis was posted to a variety of command and staff positions both within the United States and abroad. Davis was promoted to Brigadier General in October 1954, after ten years as a Colonel. He was promoted to Major General in June 1959 and to Lieutenant General in April 1965. Despite persistent rumors of his impending promotion to full General, no such promotion was pending by the time of his retirement on January 31, 1970. On December 9, 1998, Davis was promoted to General on the Retired List, receiving his fourth star from President William Clinton in a ceremony held in the Presidential Hall of the Old Executive Office Building in Washington, DC. The promotion came only after the Tuskegee Airmen approached Senator John McCain of Arizona, who agreed that the promotion was warranted by Davis' service.

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0% Complete

13 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Interview with Sam Gilliam, 1978 June 29

Art historian and critic Judith Wilson wrote about visual art and cultural politics for Ms. Magazine and in her academic career focused on African American art and black visual culture. Within Wilson’s papers at the Archives of American Art there are 97 sound cassette tapes and four CDs of interviews conducted with artists, their associates, and collectors for various writing projects. Judith Wilson conducted this interview with Washington, DC based Color Field painter and educator Sam Gilliam on June 29, 1978. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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