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3% Complete

29 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Celebrating 175: Chiura Obata, Diary 1 from Topaz, circa 1943

Join the Archives of American Art and the Smithsonian Transcription Center throughout the next year as we celebrate the Smithsonian's 175th birthday! Explore the lives and worlds of 175 different US art world figures on their birthdays, one for each year since the Smithsonian's founding in 1846. Who was born on this day? In 1885, Chiura Obata. Note: this project contains text in Japanese. Please keep the transcription in the original language and include diacritics when present. Please do not offer translation of the document.

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6% Complete

15 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Celebrating 175: Chiura Obata, Diary 2 from Topaz, 1943

Join the Archives of American Art and the Smithsonian Transcription Center throughout the next year as we celebrate the Smithsonian's 175th birthday! Explore the lives and worlds of 175 different US art world figures on their birthdays, one for each year since the Smithsonian's founding in 1846. Who was born on this day? In 1885, Chiura Obata. Note: this project contains text in Japanese. Please keep the transcription in the original language and include diacritics when present. Please do not offer translation of the document.

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14% Complete

310 Total Pages 63 Contributing Members

Tennessee Assistant Commissioner, Records Relating to Abandoned Property, Applications for Restoration of Property, C–H, Part 4

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Tennessee, Series 18: Records Relating to Abandoned Property. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Tennessee during the Reconstruction Era.

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19% Complete

118 Total Pages 30 Contributing Members

Celebrating 175: Chiura Obata, Diary from Topaz and St. Louis Resettlement, circa 1943

Join the Archives of American Art and the Smithsonian Transcription Center throughout the next year as we celebrate the Smithsonian's 175th birthday! Explore the lives and worlds of 175 different US art world figures on their birthdays, one for each year since the Smithsonian's founding in 1846. Who was born on this day? In 1885, Chiura Obata. Note: this project contains text in Japanese. Please keep the transcription in the original language and include diacritics when present. Please do not offer translation of the document.

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19% Complete

310 Total Pages 76 Contributing Members

Tennessee Assistant Commissioner, Records Relating to Abandoned Property, Applications for Restoration of Property, C–H, Part 5

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Tennessee, Series 18: Records Relating to Abandoned Property. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Tennessee during the Reconstruction Era.

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22% Complete

157 Total Pages 57 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Claims), Letters Sent, Vol. 3 (197), July 1867–July 1868

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.33: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Assistant Superintendent – Claims Division). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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23% Complete

30 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Celebrating 175: Chiura Obata, Letters of Appreciation from Tanforan and Topaz Art School Students, 1942-1943

Join the Archives of American Art and the Smithsonian Transcription Center throughout the next year as we celebrate the Smithsonian's 175th birthday! Explore the lives and worlds of 175 different US art world figures on their birthdays, one for each year since the Smithsonian's founding in 1846. Who was born on this day? In 1885, Chiura Obata. Note: this project contains text in Japanese. Please keep the transcription in the original language and include diacritics when present. Please do not offer translation of the document.

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35% Complete

310 Total Pages 88 Contributing Members

Tennessee Assistant Commissioner, Records Relating to Abandoned Property, Applications for Restoration of Property, C–H, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Tennessee, Series 18: Records Relating to Abandoned Property. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Tennessee during the Reconstruction Era.

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38% Complete

348 Total Pages 87 Contributing Members

Registers and Letters Received by the Commissioner, Letters Received, Entered in Register 2, L, Oct. 1865–Feb. 1866

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Registers and Letters Received by the Commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, Series 2: Letters Received. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women during the Reconstruction Era.

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41% Complete

197 Total Pages 70 Contributing Members

National Numismatic Collection - German Notgeld Notes, Set 9

PLEASE NOTE: THIS PROJECT INCLUDES MATERIALS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND REQUIRES SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS. Please review these guidelines before getting started. Help us transcribe German Notgeld Notes from the Smithsonian’s National Numismatic Collection (NNC). German Notgeld is a form of emergency currency that was created by cities and towns under German control following World War I. In a time of uncertainty that impacted the nation’s financial system causing currency shortages, these locally issued notes supplemented what the government was able to provide. Often the notes are highly illustrated and colorful. Notgeld notes provided an opportunity for townspeople to demonstrate cultural identities and pride through detailed images of cityscapes, landscapes, historic events, landmarks, important people, and legends / folklore. The NNC recently digitized over 6,500 of these notes and we need your help in transcribing and translating them. As it is the centenary for these notes there has been an increase in research interest and we need your help to better understand these notes and increase their access.

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