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5% Complete

170 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Martin Moynihan - Diglossa (Flowerpiercers) (1 of 4)

How does a bird reach the nectar when a flower blossom is elongated and their bill is short? In these field notes, evolutionary biologist Martin H. Moynihan (1928-1996) records his observations of a species known as flowerpiercers because of their special behavior made possible by a "hook" at the end of their bill. Moynihan often observed different species on his expeditions and later grouped those notes according to species. This is the first of four groups of notes that span an eighteen-year period, 1958 - 1974, and four countries in Central America and northern South America. Join up with a team of volunpeers to transcribe them. Your work will make them more accessible to researchers around the world.

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5% Complete

34 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Miscellaneous P: Pru-Pyn, 1924-1977

Letters with miscellaneous correspondents from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world’s foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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9% Complete

74 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Miscellaneous R: Rh-Ric, 1923-1972

Letters with miscellaneous correspondents from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world’s foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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13% Complete

53 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Miscellaneous R: R-Ra, 1925-1977

Letters with miscellaneous correspondents from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world’s foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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14% Complete

131 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Miscellaneous R: Re, 1924-1976

Letters with miscellaneous correspondents from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world’s foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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30% Complete

226 Total Pages 96 Contributing Members

Friedrich "Fritz" Rumpf Notebooks - Set 2

Friedrich Karl Georg Rumpf (1888-1949) German illustrator and ethnographer, and son of German artist Fritz Rumpf. The younger Fritz Rumpf was living in Japan at the outbreak of war and likely composed parts of at least one of the following notebooks while living as a prisoner of war. PLEASE NOTE: The notebooks will be a special challenge as they contain multiple notes in German and Japanese, and drawings in pencil, ink and wash made during his travels and research in Japan.

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40% Complete

110 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Annie Jump Cannon 23

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Annie Jump Cannon, who in 1901 devised a robust and elegant stellar classification scheme that astronomers still use today. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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41% Complete

24 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Horses and Grooms Crossing a River

In this short handscroll, artist Zhao Mengfu depicts three grooms and fifteen horses in various postures crossing a river. By combining the colorful realism of the Tang dynasty (618-907) with the ink line drawing of the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127) literati tradition, Zhao Mengfu established a new direction for his fellow painters during the transitional years of the late thirteenth century. While the painting does not exhibit the superb skill and fluency of the artist's genuine works, it is probably a close copy of an original composition by Zhao and may have been executed by one of his more accomplished followers. Help make this beautiful handscroll more accessible for researchers around the world by transcribing the Chinese characters. Please note: Freer Sackler staff are ONLY asking for the transcription of the text this collection, so please transcribe using the corresponding Chinese characters (you will need a basic knowledge of Chinese and access to a Chinese language keyboard for this). You do not need to transcribe the red stamped seals. Translation and transliteration are also not needed, and staff have requested that images not be described. Please reach out with any questions.

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43% Complete

99 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Yamada Diary

Help us transcribe this WWII Japanese diary. At the end of World War II, an unknown United States Marine brought home several Japanese-language items. These items were subsequently sold and the purchaser's son later donated them to the National Air and Space Museum. In 2003 and 2004, Museum volunteers, Mr. Koji Hayama and Mr. Tom Momiyama, translated parts of the material and they believe that they were created by a Mr. Yamada, who was probably part of an aircraft ground crew with occasional flight duties, and served in Manchuria, Korea, Burma, and the Philippines. Transcriptions of this diary will help National Air and Space Museum curators as they begin research for new exhibits. Please note that this diary is written in Japanese, and requires access to a Japanese keyboard, and basic knowledge of the language, for transcription. NASM staff are also interested in any translations that can be provided of the diary's contents. Please separate any translations by including them below the transcriptions for each page, and by indicating the translation with brackets. For example: [[translation]] text here [[/translation]]. Please reach out with any questions.

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53% Complete

246 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Cecilia H. Payne #11

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the early work of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, who discovered that stars, and the whole universe, were made abundantly of hydrogen -- a discovery that earned her the first PhD in Astronomy from Harvard. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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