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38% Complete

226 Total Pages 130 Contributing Members

Friedrich "Fritz" Rumpf Notebooks - Set 2

Friedrich Karl Georg Rumpf (1888-1949) German illustrator and ethnographer, and son of German artist Fritz Rumpf. The younger Fritz Rumpf was living in Japan at the outbreak of war and likely composed parts of at least one of the following notebooks while living as a prisoner of war. PLEASE NOTE: The notebooks will be a special challenge as they contain multiple notes in German and Japanese, and drawings in pencil, ink and wash made during his travels and research in Japan.

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46% Complete

99 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Yamada Diary

Help us transcribe this WWII Japanese diary. At the end of World War II, an unknown United States Marine brought home several Japanese-language items. These items were subsequently sold and the purchaser's son later donated them to the National Air and Space Museum. In 2003 and 2004, Museum volunteers, Mr. Koji Hayama and Mr. Tom Momiyama, translated parts of the material and they believe that they were created by a Mr. Yamada, who was probably part of an aircraft ground crew with occasional flight duties, and served in Manchuria, Korea, Burma, and the Philippines. Transcriptions of this diary will help National Air and Space Museum curators as they begin research for new exhibits. Please note that this diary is written in Japanese, and requires access to a Japanese keyboard, and basic knowledge of the language, for transcription. NASM staff are also interested in any translations that can be provided of the diary's contents. Please separate any translations by including them below the transcriptions for each page, and by indicating the translation with brackets. For example: [[translation]] text here [[/translation]]. Please reach out with any questions.

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48% Complete

82 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Henrietta Swan Leavitt #21

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Henrietta Swan Leavitt, who connected the luminosity and periodicity of certain variable stars such that we were able to understand just how big our universe is. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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50% Complete

14 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Interview with Michael Asher, March 1981 - Part 2

Jan Butterfield was an art writer and critic of contemporary art who spent most of her career in California. She is best known for her writings on late twentieth century installation and craft artists, particularly those who worked in California and the American West. In Jan Butterfield’s papers at the Archives of American Art, there are 107 sound tape reels, 97 cassettes, and 1 video reel of her interviews. Jan Butterfield conducted this interview with Michael Asher in March 1981.

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56% Complete

367 Total Pages 68 Contributing Members

Martin H. Moynihan - Diglossa (Flower piercers) (4 of 4)

Scientist or administrator, can you be both? Resident Naturalist Martin Moynihan's personal papers are filled with his field notes studying many Central and South American species. These notes here are the fourth set in his study of Diglossa, called flower piercers for the way they feed. By this point, Moynihan had served as the Resident Naturalist of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute for six years, at work transforming the research station into one recognized globally for its productivity. Join in with other volunteers and travel with Moynihan through four South American countries as you transcribe his research observations.

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63% Complete

211 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Offices of Staff Officers, Asst. Quartermaster, Letters Received, Entered in Vol. 1, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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64% Complete

42 Total Pages 38 Contributing Members

Russell Greenberg - Field notes, Mexico, 1987

Commemorate World Migratory Bird Day by transcribing the field notes of Russell Greenberg, the ornithologist responsible for launching the annual celebration in 1993. Greenberg was the founding director of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, and established Smithsonian’s Bird Friendly Coffee program. He is also responsible for discovering that birds’ bills help regulate their body temperature. Before the center was even created, Greenberg recorded these notes on a trip to Mexico in 1987. He noted the times of his activities, weather, and birds he observed that day, among other details. Join a group of volunpeers in describing golden-fronted woodpeckers, tropical kingbirds, black-headed saltators, and so many more birds.

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73% Complete

19 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Legends of the Deaf Community: B. Ennis, Sonnenstrahl, Gannon, Tom Fields JUL 02 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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75% Complete

101 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Beaufort, Letters Sent, Volume 1 (70), Jan. 1866–Aug. 1867

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.2: Subordinate Field Offices: Beaufort (Subassistant Commissioner). Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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75% Complete

57 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Cecilia H. Payne #16

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the early work of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, who discovered that stars, and the whole universe, were made abundantly of hydrogen -- a discovery that earned her the first PhD in Astronomy from Harvard. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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