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30% Complete

349 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Mississippi Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Jackson (Acting Asst. Comm.), Registered Letters Received, Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of Mississippi, Series 3.21: Subordinate Field Offices: Jackson (Acting Assistant Commissioner of the Northern District). Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in Mississippi during the Reconstruction Era.

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36% Complete

226 Total Pages 123 Contributing Members

Friedrich "Fritz" Rumpf Notebooks - Set 2

Friedrich Karl Georg Rumpf (1888-1949) German illustrator and ethnographer, and son of German artist Fritz Rumpf. The younger Fritz Rumpf was living in Japan at the outbreak of war and likely composed parts of at least one of the following notebooks while living as a prisoner of war. PLEASE NOTE: The notebooks will be a special challenge as they contain multiple notes in German and Japanese, and drawings in pencil, ink and wash made during his travels and research in Japan.

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38% Complete

21 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore: What is Deaf Folklore? JUN 26 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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38% Complete

252 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Delegate Magazine 1973

Founded by Pittsburgh Courier journalist C. Melvin Patrick, each yearly-issue of Delegate contains hundreds of photographs providing coverage of African American professional and fraternal organizations, special events, award recognitions, individuals of note, and newsworthy situations. The magazine was a virtual year in review of African American life in the United States during the 1960s and 1980s. Published by MelPat Associates, Delegate magazines were distributed free of charge by African American organizations at their conferences and meetings. Help us transcribe this issue to make the names, places, and events discoverable to all.

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41% Complete

841 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS? SET 12

Come help us improve our digital records for the United States National Herbarium (US)! Please join us in our effort to transcribe the locality information for our difficult to decipher US Specimens. The records in this project are special cases in which the locality information requires some detective work. We'd like to ask for your help in digging a little deeper to find the Country and Territory/State/Province for each of these specimens sheets labels; see special instructions and examples here . Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions. Note: Do not erase notes from other volunteers or staff; rather, leave existing comments and add your own.

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44% Complete

81 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

Cleofé Calderón - Brasil 1979, Amazonia #3

The sheer number of specimens agrostologist Cleofé Calderón collected for the Smithsonian, evidenced in this 1979 notebook, make it hard to believe that in just a few years, Calderón completely retired from botany. She remained in Washington after stepping away from the U.S. National Herbarium in 1985, but rarely returned to the Smithsonian, especially after her longtime professional partner Dr. Tom Soderstrom passed away in 1987. After breaking from the field, Calderón worked at a bibliographic service before retiring and returning to Argentina in 2005. Just two years later, she passed away. Your assistance in transcribing this project will ensure that Cleofé Calderón’s important work will not be forgotten. Calderón's handwriting can be a little difficult to read, so feel free to see how volunpeers have transcribed her work.

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44% Complete

9 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Smithsonian Memories Project, 1996 – N. Pope

When Nancy Pope scored an interview with the Smithsonian National Museum of American History’s National Philatelic Collection in 1984, she was ecstatic. She put the phone down, called a friend, and asked: “what does ‘philatelic’ mean.” For the next few years, she poured over stamps and postal history. Pope became such an expert that by the time the National Postal Museum opened in 1993, she curated the first exhibits. Today, she is the head curator of the museum. Pop your headphones in and join a group of volunpeers in transcribing Pope’s recollections, from her early days on the job to what it was like to open a new Smithsonian museum.

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45% Complete

99 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Yamada Diary

Help us transcribe this WWII Japanese diary. At the end of World War II, an unknown United States Marine brought home several Japanese-language items. These items were subsequently sold and the purchaser's son later donated them to the National Air and Space Museum. In 2003 and 2004, Museum volunteers, Mr. Koji Hayama and Mr. Tom Momiyama, translated parts of the material and they believe that they were created by a Mr. Yamada, who was probably part of an aircraft ground crew with occasional flight duties, and served in Manchuria, Korea, Burma, and the Philippines. Transcriptions of this diary will help National Air and Space Museum curators as they begin research for new exhibits. Please note that this diary is written in Japanese, and requires access to a Japanese keyboard, and basic knowledge of the language, for transcription. NASM staff are also interested in any translations that can be provided of the diary's contents. Please separate any translations by including them below the transcriptions for each page, and by indicating the translation with brackets. For example: [[translation]] text here [[/translation]]. Please reach out with any questions.

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45% Complete

180 Total Pages 46 Contributing Members

William Ockleford Oldman Archive Research Materials - Sales Register: Pistols, 1914-1916

Help us transcribe "Sales Register: Pistols, 1914-1916" from the William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials! For instructions on how to transcribe this material, please view the project instructions page here . The William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials are comprised of digital surrogates of the business records of Oldman held by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. These records include detailed information about his purchases and sales of objects including names of original sources for objects he acquired and sold. Since this provenance information is critically important to the documentation of NMAI’s collections, NMAI and Te Papa have begun a collaborative research project to make the Oldman materials available to the public for research and scholarship. William Ockleford Oldman (1879 – 1949) was a British collector and dealer of ethnographic art and European arms and armour. His business W.O. Oldman, Ethnographical Specimens, London was active between the late 1890s and 1913. Oldman purchased items from various sources including from auctions, directly from other collectors and dealers and also from many small British museums and historic houses. He held regular auctions to sell items and also reserved items for possible sale to particular private collectors, scholars, and heritage institutions including the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, NMAI’s predecessor institution. Ethnographic specimens with a provenance to Oldman’s business can now be found in various public institutions around the world including the National Museum of the American Indian.

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46% Complete

28 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

USNM - Curators Annual Reports - Department of Fishes: Annual Report, 1891-1892

No one would call U.S. National Museum Curator of Fishes Tarleton H. Bean lazy. In fact, Bean was so busy in the year 1891-92, splitting his time between the U.S. Fish Commission and his duties with the Smithsonian, that he admittedly barely did much at the museum. Fortunately, Bean still focused on collecting for the department of fishes during expeditions with the commission. For instance, some of the specimen collected during the commission’s trips aboard the steamer Albatross, through the North Pacific and Bering Sea, found their ways to the museum’s collections. Dive in with a group of volunpeers to read more about the 554 new specimens added and numerous publications written by the division.

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