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53% Complete

13 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Interview with Sam Gilliam, 1978 June 29

Art historian and critic Judith Wilson wrote about visual art and cultural politics for Ms. Magazine and in her academic career focused on African American art and black visual culture. Within Wilson’s papers at the Archives of American Art there are 97 sound cassette tapes and four CDs of interviews conducted with artists, their associates, and collectors for various writing projects. Judith Wilson conducted this interview with Washington, DC based Color Field painter and educator Sam Gilliam on June 29, 1978. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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56% Complete

459 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

Fred Wiseman Scrapbook

Fred Wiseman (1875-1961) was born in Santa Rosa, California, and after attending local schools he engaged in both the bicycle and automotive businesses. Wiseman won considerable fame racing Stoddard-Dayton cars on the West Coast as well as in the Chicago area. He became interested in aviation after attending the Wright brothers' homecoming celebration in 1909 and the first Los Angeles aviation meet at Dominguez Field in 1910. After these two events, Wiseman was convinced he wanted to learn to fly and so he returned to his home in Santa Rosa and persuaded Ben Noonan to put up $10,000 to build a plane. Wiseman, along with J. W. Peters and D.C. Prentiss, built a biplane named the Wiseman-Peters. During July 1910, both Peters and Wiseman flew the Wiseman-Peters and the following year Wiseman entered the 1911 Aviation Meet at Selfridge Field, Michigan. On February 17, 1911, Wiseman made the first airplane-carried mail flight officially sanctioned by any local U.S. post office and made available to the public when he carried mail, a bundle of newspapers and a sack of groceries from Petaluma, CA, to Santa Rosa, CA. (The first air mail flight sanctioned by the U.S. Post Office in Washington, D.C., took place on September 23, 1911, when Earle Ovington carried mail from Garden City, Long Island, to Mineola; and the first continuously scheduled U.S. air mail service began on May 15, 1918, with routes between Washington, Philadelphia, and New York.) During 1911, Wiseman had an active season of exhibition work, including flying for one week at the California State Fair. However, after this season Wiseman gave up flying because he thought there was no future in it. He sold his plane and returned to the automobile business. He later worked for Standard Oil Company of California. Wiseman was a member of the Early Birds of Aviation, an organization of pilots who flew solo in an aircraft prior to December 17, 1916. Weldon Cooke, another pioneer aviator from California, bought and modified the Wiseman-Peters aircraft, renaming it the Wiseman-Cooke. Cooke flew the Wiseman-Cooke for exhibition and air mail flights. The Wiseman-Cooke aircraft is currently part of the Smithsonian Institution's collections.

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57% Complete

42 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

Oral History, Gordon Ekholm, Side 2, Part 1, Winter-Spring 1971, William C. Sturtevant Papers

This is a recording in a series of audio recordings by William Curtis Sturtevant, longtime Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History. This is part one of an oral history conducted by Sturtevant and Shirley Gorenstein on March 30, 1971 with fellow anthropologist and curator at the American Museum of Natural History, Gordon Ekholm. Ekholm was an expert in pre-Columbian archeology of Mexico and Central America. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning..

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57% Complete

42 Total Pages 32 Contributing Members

Russell Greenberg - Field notes, Mexico, 1987

Commemorate World Migratory Bird Day by transcribing the field notes of Russell Greenberg, the ornithologist responsible for launching the annual celebration in 1993. Greenberg was the founding director of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, and established Smithsonian’s Bird Friendly Coffee program. He is also responsible for discovering that birds’ bills help regulate their body temperature. Before the center was even created, Greenberg recorded these notes on a trip to Mexico in 1987. He noted the times of his activities, weather, and birds he observed that day, among other details. Join a group of volunpeers in describing golden-fronted woodpeckers, tropical kingbirds, black-headed saltators, and so many more birds.

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58% Complete

307 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

William Jones World War II Scrapbook

William Jones was an aerial photographer in the Army Air Corps during World War II. During the occupation of Japan, Jones photographed the atomic bomb damage of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki at low altitude. After his discharge he continued in his photography career, owning and operating a studio, Jones Photos, in Columbia City, Indiana, for over 43 years. PLEASE NOTE: for the maps, images, and photographs in this collection, please simply transcribe words, captions and annotations. Descriptions of the images, photographs, and maps are not required. If you choose to add descriptions, please place them in the notes field with brackets [[image description]] man in hat smiling [[/image description]] etc.

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61% Complete

13 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Smithsonian Memories Project, 1996 – C. Booth

Following his retirement from a long military career between 1945 and 1968, Carvester Booth decided to take a vacation. He traveled to Washington, D.C, and went on a sightseeing tour of the Smithsonian museums. And there he remained for the next twenty-two years as a security officer. Booth really loved the Smithsonian. He began working for the National Air and Space Museum in 1976, the day before it opened, and protected various other museums on the National Mall. If you feel like a good listen and laugh, join a group of volunpeers in transcribing Booth’s interview from the 1996 Folklife Festival in which he recounts a typical day of an officer at the Smithsonian.

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61% Complete

86 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Callewaert, Michel, 1935-[1939], 1957-1960

Letters from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world's foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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65% Complete

349 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Mississippi Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Jackson (Acting Asst. Comm.), Registered Letters Received, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of Mississippi, Series 3.21: Subordinate Field Offices: Jackson (Acting Assistant Commissioner of the Northern District). Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in Mississippi during the Reconstruction Era.

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69% Complete

222 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

Delegate Magazine 1972

Founded by Pittsburgh Courier journalist C. Melvin Patrick, each yearly-issue of Delegate contains hundreds of photographs providing coverage of African American professional and fraternal organizations, special events, award recognitions, individuals of note, and newsworthy situations. The magazine was a virtual year in review of African American life in the United States during the 1960s and 1980s. Published by MelPat Associates, Delegate magazines were distributed free of charge by African American organizations at their conferences and meetings. Help us transcribe this issue to make the names, places, and events discoverable to all.

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69% Complete

131 Total Pages 36 Contributing Members

Proceedings of the Board of Regents Meeting held on May 7, 1990

In this 1990 report, Smithsonian’s Board of Regents prepared for a vacancy in its membership, and a very familiar name was floated around. Enter future Smithsonian Secretary I. Michael Heyman. The nominating committee limited their choice to three candidates, but ultimately decided on Heyman, who was the Chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley. They justified their recommendation by explaining his availability, interest in museums, and track record of providing leadership and garnering financial support. The Board agreed and the rest is history. Join a group of volunpeers in transcribing this report which also addresses the Smithsonian’s financial problems, plans for the National Postal Museum, continued discussions about the location of the National Air and Space Museum extension, and more.

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