Portugal with Pleasure unedited voice track, 1966 June 24, Lisa Chickering and Jeanne Porterfield Collection


Web Video Text Tracks Format (WebVTT)


WEBVTT

00:00:00.000 --> 00:00:08.000
[[test beep]]

00:00:08.000 --> 00:00:11.000
[SILENCE]

00:00:11.000 --> 00:00:18.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Our trip through Portugal began in Lisbon, and to arrive at twilight was unforgettable.

00:00:18.000 --> 00:00:27.000
When darkness falls, the fados - haunting songs so typical of Portugal - tell their poignant story.

00:00:27.000 --> 00:00:37.000
The morning light revealed one of the world's most beautiful cities, spreading gracefully over a series of hills that dipped down to the Tagus River.

00:00:37.000 --> 00:00:59.000
Lisbon's romance and history of yesterday are reflected in the ancient Tower of Belem, the church and monastery of Jerónimos, and the impressive Discoverer's Monument, dedicated to Prince Henry the Navigator, who brought about some of the world's greatest explorations.

00:00:59.000 --> 00:01:10.000
Among the important landmarks devoted to Portugal's past we found Black Horse Square, a splendid setting for the parades of the present.

00:01:10.000 --> 00:01:22.000
Along with the historical places of interest to see, Lisbon's air of gaiety and glamor is accented by the many sidewalk cafes, scattered throughout the city.

00:01:22.000 --> 00:01:36.000
Although Lisbon is a large, cosmopolitan city, with a population of one million, the charm and graciousness of its people give it all the warmth and friendliness of a small town.

00:01:36.000 --> 00:01:50.000
The most exciting time of the year is the holiday dedicated to St. Anthony, the patron saint of Lisbon, and the oldest section of the city, known as the Alfama, reflects the festive mood.

00:01:50.000 --> 00:01:59.000
For the celebration, the maze of its narrow streets are all ablaze with brightness and color.

00:01:59.000 --> 00:02:10.690
Here everyone is caught up in the infectious spirit, and dancing in the streets goes on from early morning, all through the day, and long into the night of St. Anthony's Eve.

00:02:16.000 --> 00:02:24.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The next day is St. Anthony's Day, and since he's also known as the marrying saint, what an appropriate time for a wedding.

00:02:24.000 --> 00:02:40.000
Here comes the bride — and another — and another. The grand total in this wedding is 61 brides in all. The annual wedding is a gift from the city, with the brides being given their gowns and trousseaus.

00:02:40.000 --> 00:02:49.000
Also, local businessmen, for this occasion, provide each bride with her own chauffeur-driven limousine.

00:02:49.000 --> 00:03:10.000
The couples must have known each other for more than a year, and have applied last St. Anthony's Day in order to be married this year. This was the largest number of couples ever to be married in the history of the ceremony, which I'm sure accounts for the largest wedding portrait ever taken.

00:03:10.000 --> 00:03:32.000
Later that day, we waited for our limousine to be delivered. Having thoroughly enjoyed ourselves exploring Lisbon, the time had come to continue on to see more of the country. Once all our baggage and paraphernalia were packed in the car, we'd be on our way, but that seems more easily said than done.

00:03:32.000 --> 00:03:46.000
Obviously, he's an optimist, but with all this still to go in, it will take more than optimism. He assured us this could be easily rectified. We had our doubts, but waited to see.

00:03:46.000 --> 00:03:59.000
Well, this ought to do it, and it did. We drove out of town to what could be called the 'Riviera of Portugal'.

00:03:59.000 --> 00:04:18.574
One of the most interesting beaches of all we found at Nazaré, a fishing town of unique character. Almost 4,000 years ago, Phoenician ships landed here, and today Nazaré still bears the mark of those early seafarers. The main street offers some unexpected features.

00:04:28.000 --> 00:04:38.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Here even the women's routine chore of putting the fish out to dry creates a tapestry of color and design.

00:04:38.000 --> 00:04:51.000
When the men return from the sea, a new tempo takes over. This group of fishermen is headed by Silvino - since he owns the boat and employs the crew, he is called 'Master of the Nets'.

00:04:51.000 --> 00:05:09.000
Oxen play an important role in Nazaré, and with their help, the boat is drawn up on the beach. Then Silvino, and his crew, as well as his family and friends, all join in the task of pulling in the fish-laden nets.

00:05:09.000 --> 00:05:24.000
With the work completed, Silvino takes a few moments to relax with his family. They share with him the life of the beach, for in Nazaré, all work, and social activity, center along the water.

00:05:24.000 --> 00:05:37.000
Their clothing is most unusual. One reason being they have no pockets, so their stocking caps are not only hats, but are quite like a woman's handbag.

00:05:37.000 --> 00:05:52.000
Perhaps this is where the saying "keep this under your hat" originated. Their incongruous plaids were said to have been brought here by Scottish troops during the Napoleonic Wars.

00:05:52.000 --> 00:06:04.000
It was fascinating to visit the people of Nazaré, and to find their ways have changed so little over the centuries.

00:06:04.000 --> 00:06:19.000
We drove on to Coimbra, a city crowned by its 13th century university, which is the first seat of learning in the country, as well as being one of the most important universities in Europe.

00:06:19.000 --> 00:06:30.391
Here we found the students have some customs that are most original. For instance, the ribbons they carry tell at a glance their class, and the subject they are majoring in.

00:06:32.000 --> 00:06:42.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The short yellow ribbons these students have indicate they are juniors in the school of medicine.

00:06:42.000 --> 00:06:52.000
Red, and long, denote seniors in the study of law. And these girls are seniors in science.

00:06:52.000 --> 00:07:13.000
Another custom concerns the capes the boys wear, with the fringe on the bottom that tells quite a story. When a boy and girl kiss, she is given the dubious honor of making a tear in his cape. What a sly way to kiss and tell.

00:07:13.000 --> 00:07:35.000
Football's a popular sport, only here the opposing team is a bull. On this play, it's Coimbra's ball with the bull fast gaining. Every spring this amazing football game takes place, along with one of the most extraordinary sports of all.

00:07:35.000 --> 00:07:54.000
The object of the game is for the boys to bring the bull to a complete standstill. They are rarely hurt, as the lead boy knows just how to land between the horns. The rest join in to bring the indignant bull to a halt.

00:07:54.000 --> 00:08:03.000
The next event was billed as the 'twist of the ballerinas', or as the program said, "Bottoms Up!".

00:08:03.000 --> 00:08:20.000
After the fun in Coimbra, we went in quest of the inns we had heard so much about, called Pousadas. And cradled within the medieval town of Obidos, we discovered the inn to be, of all things, a castle.

00:08:20.000 --> 00:08:32.000
Here we were magically transported back to the 12th century, when kings of yore occupied its royal rooms, which have now been remodeled into charming accommodations for the guests.

00:08:32.000 --> 00:08:43.986
We felt we could remain here forever, but due to the extreme popularity of the Pousadas, one can stay only a maximum of five days in each, so we continued on to others.

00:08:46.000 --> 00:09:00.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Scattered throughout the country, each Pousada is distinctive in mood and architecture, although one thing is always uniform - the low price of less than four dollars a day for everything.

00:09:00.000 --> 00:09:15.000
The most outstanding one is dramatically located 7 miles at sea on the rocky island of Berlenga. Here this isolated old monastery fortress has been ingeniously converted into another enchanting Pousada.

00:09:15.000 --> 00:09:36.000
Surrounded by the sea, the views are wonderful - and this view is no exception - well, except for one thing: it's from our own Pousada. The vast stretches of deserted beach provided a perfect place for setting up what we called our portable Pousada.

00:09:36.000 --> 00:09:52.000
Complete with icebox, stove, closets, beds - everything needed for light housekeeping - the camper added another enjoyable, as well as most-convenient feature, to our trip through Portugal.

00:09:52.000 --> 00:10:03.000
With over 500 miles of coast, this small country has some of the most beautiful beaches to be found in all of Europe.

00:10:03.000 --> 00:10:15.000
The sea has always provided Portugal with a richness of life, and one of its bounties is the kelp gathered by these men wearing an unusual form of dress.

00:10:15.000 --> 00:10:25.000
As the early Romans were here for many centuries, this could account for the Romanesque tunics still being worn today.

00:10:25.000 --> 00:10:44.000
Graceful boats are another means of gathering kelp. On both the prow and the stern there are gay decorations depicting scenes from everyday life, making them what could be called floating galleries of folk art.

00:10:44.000 --> 00:10:52.000
[[silence]]

00:10:52.000 --> 00:11:00.000
Color and drama accompany the sardine fishermens' activities as they set forth to take their share from the sea.

00:11:00.000 --> 00:11:23.185
The most exciting form of fishing takes place five miles off the coast, where the giant tuna are caught. Here, a complex series of nets have been laid far below the surface in which the unsuspecting fish are trapped. And as the fishermen pull in the heavy nets, the rhythmic pulse of their primitive chant rings out over the water.

00:11:26.000 --> 00:11:49.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The men pull the nets for over an hour, which draws their boats closer together, and at the same time, brings the captured tuna near the surface. The fish weigh anywhere from 500 to 700 pounds, and are over six feet in length, and as their moment of truth arrives, a tense excitement takes over.

00:11:49.000 --> 00:12:14.000
The most spectacular part is when the men get right into the water to combat the fish by hand. These silver giants of the sea fight furiously, and have been known to break a man's back or even kill him with a single blow from the tail. So the men are risking their lives in this battle of the deep.

00:12:14.000 --> 00:12:26.000
May through August, the chants of the fishermen can be heard from dawn to dusk, as they enact one of mankind's oldest and most thrilling dramas of the sea.

00:12:26.000 --> 00:12:40.000
Flourishing along the Douro River are the sun-splashed vineyards. This is the only region that yields the special grapes used in producing port wine, so famous to Portugal.

00:12:40.000 --> 00:12:53.000
Following the river, we came to Porto. This is the second-largest, as well as the oldest city of the country, and is most renowned for being the home of port wine.

00:12:53.000 --> 00:13:04.000
Not only did Porto give the wine its name, but also the entire country is named after this lively metropolis.

00:13:04.000 --> 00:13:15.000
Although there was little room to spare, our 20th century car did make it through the 12th century gateway into the medieval town of Braganza.

00:13:15.000 --> 00:13:28.617
Here an aura of antiquity prevailed, with little changed over the centuries. And predating the ancient town itself, a strange dance was being performed in celebration of a plentiful harvest.

00:13:32.000 --> 00:13:37.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Another dance, for another occasion.

00:13:37.000 --> 00:13:47.000
It seems the Portuguese take every opportunity to celebrate - and this is in anticipation of a wedding.

00:13:47.000 --> 00:14:01.000
We were invited to attend the traditional ceremony that united this young couple, but were surprised to find one very untraditional note: The bride wore black.

00:14:01.000 --> 00:14:27.000
Along with the unusual wedding gown, the brides here are bedecked with ornate gold jewelry. Instead of putting their money in the bank, the women put it into gold which in turn they put around their necks. What a treasure chest. Maria's collection has been handed down in her family for generations.

00:14:27.000 --> 00:14:53.000
Having been invited to their wedding, we invited them to what we jokingly called "The Mansion". And since it was a nice day, we all stayed out on the veranda drinking a toast to the newlyweds. What a setting for a wedding reception.
[SILENCE]

00:14:53.000 --> 00:15:10.000
We were in quite a hurry - as were others - and for good reason. Close behind, the campinos - who are the cowboys of the country - were galloping into the town of Santarém for their annual fair.

00:15:10.000 --> 00:15:18.000
Hundreds of them have gathered from the many ranches to exhibit the skills that are part of a cowboy's life.

00:15:18.000 --> 00:15:28.000
Awards are given to the campinos who excel in the various contests, so the ranchers have sent their very best men.

00:15:28.000 --> 00:15:36.339
After the fair, this campino is welcomed home by José Rodriquez owner of one of the largest ranches.

00:15:39.000 --> 00:15:48.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Here in this vast plain area, he specializes in raising not only horses but fine fighting bulls as well.

00:15:48.000 --> 00:15:58.000
José is also a 'caballero' - the name given to the men of Portugal who fight the bulls from magnificently trained horses.

00:15:58.000 --> 00:16:16.000
These free moments with his wife and children are a happy treat for all of them. Being a leading caballero, much of his time is spent away from home - appearing not only in the bull rings of Portugal but also those of Spain and Brazil.

00:16:16.000 --> 00:16:31.000
Little Lizbeth often accompanies her father to see the bulls, which fascinate her. José explains though, that they aren't like her gentle donkey and she must never get close to them, but! keep a good distance away.

00:16:31.000 --> 00:16:40.000
A highlight is when José, on his horse named Yankee, practices in his private ring.

00:16:40.000 --> 00:17:02.000
It takes great skill and dedicated work to train a horse in the artistic style of the Portuguese bull fight. During the season, José practices five hours a day with Yankee, carefully putting him through his turns and paces.
[SILENCE]

00:17:02.000 --> 00:17:11.000
A vital part of the training is getting the horse accustomed to a bull, as they're afraid of them.

00:17:11.000 --> 00:17:18.000
José now practices making passes by touching the young bull's neck with a blunt pole.

00:17:18.000 --> 00:17:31.000
This sport originated when man fought war from horseback and in order to keep himself and his steed in top form for combat he trained in this manner.

00:17:31.000 --> 00:17:41.000
The most stirring spectacle is seen in the big ring.

00:17:41.000 --> 00:17:51.150
Escorted by this procession of pomp and pageantry, the caballeros step from their royal coach to greet the presiding officials and enthusiastic audience.

00:17:54.000 --> 00:18:04.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The carriages and costumes of this colorful cortège all date from the 17th century.

00:18:04.000 --> 00:18:19.000
The Portuguese bull fight is different from others, as it's against the law to kill the bull. Also, his horns are covered with a heavy leather padding which in turn protects the horse.

00:18:19.000 --> 00:18:30.000
The Caballero must place small darts on the insensitive part of the bull's neck and at the same time keep his horse clear of the charging beast.

00:18:30.000 --> 00:18:40.000
Sometimes when the bull gets unnervingly near the horse, a 'Cape Man' leaps into divert him, but, not for long.

00:18:40.000 --> 00:18:57.000
After the final pass of the afternoon, cows lead the furious bull docily out of the ring, with nothing hurt but his ego.
[SILENCE]

00:18:57.000 --> 00:19:04.000
After the excitement of the bull fight, we relaxed a bit before continuing on.

00:19:04.000 --> 00:19:14.000
Driving along, we noticed that the women carry almost everything on their heads - from the more expected to the completely unexpected.

00:19:14.000 --> 00:19:21.000
But the most remarkable sight of all was this:

00:19:21.000 --> 00:19:39.000
These elaborate towers are the main attraction of the Festival of the Trays which takes place only once every four years. Here in the usually tranquil town of Tomar, thousands have gathered from all parts of Europe for the event.

00:19:39.000 --> 00:19:50.000
Made of paper flowers interspersed with loaves of freshly baked bread, each tray weighs thirty pounds and must be as tall as the girl who carries it.

00:19:50.000 --> 00:20:10.400
Every girl is accompanied by a boy to help her should her tray fall and together they parade all through town. This procession originated in pagan times, for when the Romans were here 2000 years ago it was already a custom. Everyone watches in wide-eyed wonder.

00:20:13.000 --> 00:20:22.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The curious cortège files into the main square after four hours of balancing their beautiful burdens.

00:20:22.000 --> 00:20:36.000
Still topped by their towering trays, they bring to an end this extraordinary pageant, the final topping to a trip through Portugal, with pleasure all the way.

00:20:36.000 --> 00:21:18.000
[SILENCE]

00:21:18.000 --> 00:21:25.000
unknown male : [[feedback]] All right, this is, uhh, room tone — start!

00:21:25.000 --> 00:22:50.410
[SILENCE]

00:23:22.000 --> 00:23:28.000
Unknown Man : Room tone - End!

00:23:28.000 --> 00:23:46.000
[SILENCE]

00:23:46.000 --> 00:23:48.000
[[tape noises]]

00:23:48.000 --> 00:23:58.000
[[ playback of tape segment with Jeanne Poterfield's voice: ]] —men feel.
Jeanne Porterfield : [[laughter]] Blast off time is here.
Unknown Man : Just give it a minute or so - I'm gonna put some tone and things on it, so—
Jeanne Porterfield : OK.
Unknown Man : —Don't pay any attention to that.

00:23:58.000 --> 00:24:02.000
[SILENCE]

00:24:02.000 --> 00:24:09.000
[[test tones]]

00:24:09.000 --> 00:24:21.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The morning light revealed one of the world's most beautiful cities, spreading gracefully over a series of hills that dipped down to the Tagus River. Repeat page one.

00:24:21.000 --> 00:24:28.000
Along with the historical places of— repeat, two. Repeat page one.

00:24:28.000 --> 00:24:35.000
Perhaps this is where the saying, "keep this under your hat", originated.

00:24:35.000 --> 00:24:44.000
Their incongruous plaids were said to have been brought here by Scottish troops during the Napoleonic Wars.

00:24:44.000 --> 00:24:56.000
It was fascinating to visit the people of Nazaré, and to find their ways had changed so little over the centuries.
Unknown Woman : Take that line again.
Jeanne Porterfield : Repeat page three.

00:24:56.000 --> 00:25:04.000
Unknown Man : Going back to, to that, why don't you go back to 'their clothing is most unusual'—
Jeanne Porterfield : OK
Unknown Man : —for my own purposes, thank you.

00:25:04.000 --> 00:25:14.000
Unknown Female : I'd like to ask you a question: Would it be possible after a couple more pages, if she wants, to stop and rest?
Unknown Man : Sure.
Jeanne Porterfield : Oh, yeah. [[tape rewind]]

00:25:14.000 --> 00:25:18.000
[SILENCE]

00:25:18.000 --> 00:25:29.550
Jeanne Porterfield : Their clothing is most unusual, one reason being they have no pockets— so their stocking caps are not only hats, but are quite like a woman's handbag.

00:25:32.000 --> 00:25:44.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Football's a popular sport, only here the opposing team — is a bull. On this play, it's Coimbra's ball, with the bull fast gaining.

00:25:44.000 --> 00:25:55.000
Every spring this amazing football game takes place, along with one of the most extraordinary sports of all.

00:25:55.000 --> 00:26:09.000
The object of the game is for the boys to bring the bull to a complete standstill. They are rarely hurt, as the lead boy knows just how to land between the horns.

00:26:09.000 --> 00:26:16.000
The rest join in to bring the indignant bull to a halt.

00:26:16.000 --> 00:26:24.000
The next event was billed as the 'twist of the ballerinas', or as the program said, "Bottoms Up!".

00:26:24.000 --> 00:26:29.000
[SILENCE]

00:26:29.000 --> 00:26:32.000
[[tape skip]]
Unknown Male : Alright, stand by please.

00:26:32.000 --> 00:26:36.000
[SILENCE]

00:26:36.000 --> 00:26:54.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The most outstanding one is dramatically located seven miles at sea, on the rocky island of Berlenga. Here this isolated old monastery fort has been ingeniously converted into another enchanting pousada. Repeat page five.

00:26:54.000 --> 00:27:11.000
The most outstanding one is dramatically located seven miles at sea, on the rocky island of Berlenga. Here this isolated old monastery fortress has been ingeniously converted into another enchanting pousada.

00:27:11.000 --> 00:27:15.000
Surrounded by— Repeat page five.

00:27:15.000 --> 00:27:33.000
Unknown Male : Go back to the same thing: 'the most outstanding'
Jeanne Porterfield : Alright. —— Surrounded by the sea, the views are wonderful, and this view is no exception. Well, except for one thing, it's from our own pousada.

00:27:33.000 --> 00:27:40.260
The vast stretches of deserted beach provided a perfect place for setting up what we called our "portable pousada".

00:27:43.000 --> 00:27:46.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Repeat page five.

00:27:46.000 --> 00:27:58.000
Unknown Man : [[garbled]]
Jeanne Porterfield : 'the vast stretches'
Unknown Man : [[garbled]]
Jeanne Porterfield : Yeah, 'the vast stretches of deserted beach'.
Unknown Man : Go back to 'surrounded by the sea', if you don't mind—
Jeanne Porterfield : Alright.

00:27:58.000 --> 00:28:07.000
Unknown Man : The sentence before, 'surrounded—'
Jeanne Porterfield : —'surrounded by the sea'— right?
Unknown Woman : [[To Jeanne:]] You all right?
Jeanne Porterfield : [[sarcaststic affirmative?]] mm-hm.

00:28:07.000 --> 00:28:12.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Repeat page six.
Unknown Woman : We heard a hinge and a door slam.

00:28:12.000 --> 00:28:21.000
That could carry into the tape.
Unknown Man : ——hear it in here, but they, alright, you want to start with——
Unknown Woman : ——I hear it.——
Jeanne Porterfield : I'll——yeah, I'll start, top of page six.

00:28:21.000 --> 00:28:31.000
Jeanne Porterfield : [[To Unknown Woman:]] Did I read that right?
Unknown Woman : Yes. You want to stop after the 'tuna'?
Jeanne Porterfield : No. Well, I might. Yes, I probably will. But I'm OK now.

00:28:31.000 --> 00:28:38.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Color and drama accompany the sardine fisher——
Unknown Man : ——Hold please.

00:28:38.000 --> 00:28:48.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Color and drama accompany the sardine fishermen's activities as they set forth to take their share from the sea.

00:28:48.000 --> 00:28:56.000
The most exciting form of fishing takes place five miles off the coast where the giant tuna are caught.

00:28:56.000 --> 00:29:14.000
Here, a complex series of nets have been laid far below the surface in which the unsuspecting fish are trapped, and as the fishermen pull in the heavy—— repeat, page six.
Unknown Woman : There's an awful lot of noise in here.

00:29:14.000 --> 00:29:30.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The men pull the nets for over an hour, which draws their boats closer together.
Unknown Man : I've lost the word 'the'.
Unknown Woman : [[whispered:]] 'the men'
Unknown Man : That sounded like just 'men', the men, meh—
Jeanne Porterfield : Alright. Same? OK.

00:29:30.000 --> 00:29:41.000
Along with the unusual wedding gown, the brides here are bedecked. Repeat page seven.

00:29:41.000 --> 00:29:56.850
Having been invited to their wedding, we invited them to what we jokingly called "The Mansion". And since it was a nice day, we all stayed out on the veranda, drinking a toast to the newlyweds. Repeat, bottom of seven.

00:30:03.000 --> 00:30:22.000
Jeanne Porterfield : What a setting for a wedding reception. José is also a caballero, the name given to the men of Portugal who fight the bulls from magnificently—— Repeat page 8.

00:30:22.000 --> 00:30:32.000
José is also a caballero, the name given to the men of Portugal who fight the bulls from magnificently trained horses.

00:30:32.000 --> 00:30:39.000
Unkown Woman : Wait, there are footsteps here.
Jeanne Porterfield : But I wasn't reading. Repeat again.

00:30:39.000 --> 00:30:49.000
Unkown Woman : Oh, that's all right——
Jeanne Porterfield : I don't think he'll hear.
Unknown Man: You have to wait for my signals——
Jeanne Porterfield : Oh, just go, oh.
Unknown Man: ——I'm rolling.
Jeanne Porterfield : Oh, fine.

00:30:49.000 --> 00:30:53.000
Repeat page 8.

00:30:53.000 --> 00:31:04.000
Little Lisbeth often accompanies her father to see the bulls, which fascinate her.
Unknown Man: I think there's a noise in there or something—
Jeanne Porterfield : Pardon me?
Unknown Man: I heard some sort of a paper noise, or something——
Jeanne Porterfield : Oh? Alright, I'll take it again.

00:31:04.000 --> 00:31:12.000
Unknown Man: Place is 'José'?
Jeanne Porterfield : No, Little Lisbeth.
Unknown Man: Sorry.

00:31:12.000 --> 00:31:28.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Little Lisbeth often accompanies her father to see the bulls, which fascinate her. José explains though that they aren't like her gentle donkey, and she must never get close to them, but, keep a good distance away.

00:31:28.000 --> 00:31:35.000
A highlight is when José—— Repeat, bottom of 8.

00:31:35.000 --> 00:31:42.000
These elaborate towers—— Repeat, page 10.

00:31:42.000 --> 00:32:00.000
After the fun in Coimbra, we went in quest of the inns we had heard so much about, called pousadas. And cradled within the medieval town of Obidos, we discovered the inn to be of all things, a castle.

00:32:00.000 --> 00:32:12.000
Here we were magically transported back to the 12th century, when kings of yore occupied its royal rooms, which have now been remodeled into charming accommodations for the guests.

00:32:12.000 --> 00:32:22.100
We felt we could remain here forever, but due to the extreme popularity of the pousadas, one can stay only a maximum of five days in each, so——
Unknown Man: ——I'm sorry, didn't get—

00:32:24.000 --> 00:32:34.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Oh? Alright, wait, I better—
Unknown Woman : Don't handle your scripts.
Jeanne Porterfield : Well, I couldn't— This has to continue, and I couldn't do this.
Unknown Woman : Oh, I see. Alright, then I'll—— [[tape squawk]]

00:32:34.000 --> 00:32:42.000
[SILENCE]

00:32:42.000 --> 00:33:00.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Here we were magically transported back to the 12th century, when kings of yore occupied its royal rooms, which have, now have been— Repeat, page 4. [[tape squawk]] This switching the pages is, upsetting me. OK.

00:33:00.000 --> 00:33:05.000
Unknown Woman : Would you rather take it after 'the fun in Coimbra', does it get you more into the mood of the whole phrase?

00:33:05.000 --> 00:33:20.000
Jeanne Porterfield : No.
Unknown Woman : Your stomach's starting to growl. This is terrible.
Unknown Man : Do you want to go back to the same place here?
Jeanne Porterfield : I'll start after 'the fun'. After 'the fun in Coimbra' - the paragraph ahead of it.
Unknown Man : [[garbled]]

00:33:20.000 --> 00:33:35.000
Jeanne Porterfield : After the fun in Coimbra, we went in quest of the inns we had heard so much about, called pousadas. And cradled within the medieval town of Obidos, we discovered the inn to be of all things, a castle.

00:33:35.000 --> 00:33:47.000
Although there was little room to spare, our 20th century car did make it through the 12th century gateway, into the medieval town of Braganza.

00:33:47.000 --> 00:34:04.000
Here, an aura of antiquity prevailed, with little changed over the centuries. And pre-dating the ancient town itself, a strange dance was being performed in celebration of a plentiful harvest.

00:34:04.000 --> 00:34:10.000
Unknown Woman : I'd take that again.
Jeanne Porterfield : OK, repeat page 7.

00:34:10.000 --> 00:34:17.000
Unknown Woman : Pre——
Jeanne Porterfield : I'm going to start all over.
Unknown Woman : ——you said *pre*vailed [[accent on "pre"]] and its pre*vail*ed [[accent on "vail"]].
Jeanne Porterfield : Repeat, page 7.

00:34:17.000 --> 00:34:25.330
Although there was little room to spare, our 20th century car did make it through the 12th century ga——
Unknown Man : ——Hold please, same place.
Jeanne Porterfield : Right.

00:34:30.000 --> 00:34:45.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Here an aura of antiquity prevailed, with little changed over the centuries. And pre-dating the ancient town itself, a strange dance was being performed in celebration of a plentiful harvest.

00:34:45.000 --> 00:34:54.000
No, I still didn't like that. I'm going to repeat again.
Unknown Woman : You said *pre*vailed [[accent on "pre"]].
Jeanne Porterfield : I know.
Unknown Woman : Ask him if it's *pre*vailed —— isn't it pre*vail*ed ?
Jeanne Porterfield : 'Here an aura pre*vail*ed —

00:34:54.000 --> 00:35:05.000
Unknown Man : Pre*vail*ed, yeah.
Jeanne Porterfield : Pre*vail* - I'm bringing out the 'pre' too much.
Unknown Woman : You're saying *pre*vail.
Unknown Man : Pre*vail*. Same place, 'although' ?
Jeanne Porterfield : Yes.

00:35:05.000 --> 00:35:17.000
Although there was little room to spare, our 20th century car did make it through the 12th century gateway, into the medieval town of Braganza.

00:35:17.000 --> 00:35:33.000
Here an aura of antiquity prevailed, with little changed over the centuries. And pre-dating the ancient town itself, a strange dance was being performed in celebration of a plentiful harvest.

00:35:33.000 --> 00:35:39.000
Another dance? Repeat page 7.

00:35:39.000 --> 00:35:55.000
Another dance?, for another occasion. It seems the Portuguese take almost every opportunity to celebrate, and this is in anticipation of a wedding.

00:35:55.000 --> 00:36:09.000
We were invited to attend the traditional ceremony that united this young couple, but were surprised to find one very untraditional note: the bride wore black!

00:36:09.000 --> 00:36:15.000
[[tape skip]]
[SILENCE]
Unknown Woman : Enjoy it, now.

00:36:15.000 --> 00:36:27.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Although there was little room to spare, our 20th century car did make it through the 12th century gateway, into the medieval town of Braganza.

00:36:27.000 --> 00:36:37.740
This sport originated when man fought war from horseback, and in order to keep himself and his steed in top form for comback—— Repeat page 9.

00:36:39.000 --> 00:36:55.000
Jeanne Porterfield : This sport— And in order to keep himself and his steed in top form for combat, he trained in this manner. Repeat again, page 9.
Unknown Woman : Don't bring out 'steed' so much.

00:36:55.000 --> 00:37:11.000
Jeanne Porterfield : José now practices making passes, by touching the young bull's neck with a blunt pole. This sport originated when man fought war from horseback.
Unknown Man : Alright, let's hold it right there for now. [[tape skip]]

00:37:11.000 --> 00:37:32.000
[SILENCE]

00:37:32.000 --> 00:37:46.000
Unknown Man : OK, this is Reel 2, and we're on top of page— well, we're about, like at the bottom of page 9. Anytime you're ready.

00:37:46.000 --> 00:37:57.000
Jeanne Porterfield : The caballero must place small darts on the insensitive part of the bull's neck, and at the same time keep his horse clear of the charging beast.

00:37:57.000 --> 00:38:08.000
Sometimes, when the bull gets unnervingly near the horse, a 'Cape Man' leaps in to divert him. But, not for long.

00:38:08.000 --> 00:38:19.000
After the final pass of the afternoon, cows lead the furious bull docilely out of the ring, with nothing hurt but his ego.

00:38:19.000 --> 00:38:26.000
[SILENCE]

00:38:26.000 --> 00:38:36.000
After the excitement of the bull fight, we relaxed a bit before continuing on. Repeat top of page 10.
Unknown Woman : Yeah, it's not 'cute', you know—

00:38:36.000 --> 00:38:47.920
Unknown Man : Excuse me, if you're gonna repeat it there, I would prefer if you don't mind, going back to the preceeding, uh, sentence, there was something in there I wasn't too happy about.
Jeanne Porterfield : Alright.
Unknown Woman : Always tell us if you think that——

00:38:56.000 --> 00:38:58.000
Unknown Man : Go back——
Jeanne Porterfield : Fine.
Unknown Man : ——just one sentence.

00:38:58.000 --> 00:39:10.000
Jeanne Porterfield : After 'the final pass of the afternoon' ?
Unknown Man : 'sometimes when the bull'
Jeanne Porterfield : Oh, alright.
Unknown Man : [[garbled]]

00:39:10.000 --> 00:39:27.000
Jeanne Porterfield : Sometimes when the——
Unknown Woman : [[garbled]], I'm sorry — Don't bring out the word 'but' so much -- [[exaggerates]] But! -- Not that, the 'but', it's: 'But, not for long'-- it's a——
Jeanne Porterfield : Alright.

00:39:27.000 --> 00:39:37.000
Everyone watches in wide-eyed wonder. Repeat that.

00:39:37.000 --> 00:39:46.000
This procession originated in pagan times, for when the Romans were here 2000 years ago, it was already a custom.

00:39:46.000 --> 00:40:00.000
Still topped by their towering trays, they bring to an end this extraordinary pageant. The final topping to a trip through Portugal, with pleasure all the way.

00:40:00.000 --> 00:40:09.000
Unknown Woman : Try it again, just for the heck of it——
Jeanne Porterfield : Repeat the last.
Unknown Woman : ——we might use the other one and we might use this one.
Jeanne Porterfield : Repeat the end of page 10.

00:40:09.000 --> 00:40:12.000
Driving along, we noticed that the women——

00:40:12.000 --> 00:40:33.672
[SILENCE]