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[[underline]] RUSSEL COWLES [[/underline]]

Born Algona, Iowa, 1887. Graduated from Dartmouth. Studied at the Art Students League and the National Academy of Design. Assisted Douglas Volk and Barry Faulkner in mural painting.

Won the Prix de Rome, 1915 and remained in Italy for 5 years. Traveled extensively in Europe and the Far East.

Of his painting, Cowles says:

"I have always been chiefly concerned with the problems involved in the treatment of space, and for several years now with the relation of deep space to the picture plane or surface of the canvas...I try to reduce my subject, or theme, to its essence and to state it in terms of a sound structural composition."

Cowles' painting has been termed "designed realism". In Cowles' work there is no conflict between subject and design, as one reinforces the other in a thoughtfully organized expression. The world Cowles creates in his painting is one of serenity and timelessness, often with romantic and humourous overtones.

Painter and water colorist. [[underline]] Represented: [[/underline]] in the collections of the Denver Art Museum; Swope Art Gallery (Terre Haute, Ind.); Minneapolis Institute of Art; Murdock Collection, Wichita Art Museum; Encyclopedia Britannica; Santa Barbara Museum of Art; Dartmouth College; Museum of New Britain Institute; Addison Gallery of American Art.

[[underline]] Awards: [[/underline]] Prix de Rome, 1915; Norman Waite Harris Silve Medal, Art Institute of Chicago, 1926; Yetter Prize, Denver Art Museum, 1936.
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