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[[preprinted]]
P. & D. COLNAGHI & CO LTD
(ESTABLISHED 1760)

TELEGRAMS: COLNAGHI, PICCY,LONDON.
TELEPHONE:HYDE PARK 1943.
DIRECTORS
J.J.BYAM SHAW, M.A.
R.Q.HENRIQUES
R.M.D.THESIGER.
A.H.DRIVER.

14 OLD BOND STREET,
LONDON, W.1.
[[/preprinted]]

24th December, 1963.

Mr. Germain Seligman,
5, East 57th Street,
New York 22, N.Y.,
U.S.A

Dear Mr. Seligman,

I am so sorry not to have written for so long after my cable of about November 26th. I hope that in the meantime the four drawings from Madame Prost have arrived safely.

With regard to the Puget drawing which Mme. Prost has herself: I fear this is one that has not been in our hands since Sir Bruce Ingram died, and I have no clear recollection of it. There were, however, 4 other drawings by or attributed to Puget: one of these is the large [[underline]] Study for the decoration of a Man o'War [[/underline]] which has now gone to the Metropolitan Museum; another is a [[underline]] Naval Battle [[/underline]] (signed) which has now gone to the British Museum; the other two are [[underline]] Studies of Mediterranean Galleys [[/underline]] - they are certainly of Puget's time, but I do not feel I know him well enough to say whether they are really by his hand, though Sir Bruce himself seemed convinced of it. If this is the sort of thing which might still interest you I can of course get photographs made.

With regard to the Guardis at Sothebys: I am sure you would not have thought these a very good speculation if you had seen them. They were very badly damaged, and in spite of what Muraro said in his article in the Burlington Magazine they were quite obviously by the same hand as the set that now belongs to Geoffrey Merton. They were all bought-in at very low prices (between £3,000 and £8,000 a piece) and though this was certainly cheap enough, the state was such that to buy them would have been something of a speculation. In any case Merton has spoiled the market for these by offering his to the National Gallery, and elsewhere, at such a fantastic price, and my impression is that the possible buyers have now become bored with the whole affair. I agree with you in thinking No.50 the best of the three
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