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all tho it were 3. oclock when we got in the trenches, and let the French troops go out. it were a night that you could not see your hands befor you, so you may no how it were in that black woods. for in the Day time, it were Dark even, we = could not see any one comeing, but you could hear them. and that is the way we went to that front line. and if == Jery, had nowen that we were comeing in that morning, you could bet that == he would made us Duck some shells, = but they onley sent over their normel amount of shells. there were all ways a shell in the air, that would land five kilos back of the line and that were all, but the next night the highway got it good and strong they even tor up the track that we useto use for bringeing up
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or Provision with a handcar, you see = that we were so far in the woods, that it were imposibele for to get them to us any other way. and this night they = were shor that we were changeing the releaf of the line, for two nights. they - gave us shell fair, and the gas were - thick, and the forest, looked as if, it = were ready, to gave up all of its trees, = every time a shell, came crashing throu - the forest, it would be miners of a tree, and trees would snape of like a pipe - stem. there were a Big Acorn tree, that stoud By my Dugout, it were a fine one But when the shell fire stired, the shells toar all the top of off it, we hardley knew what to do. for we could not fight == [[crossout]]shells. But we could the Germens, we would rather for the Germens, to come
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