Viewing page 3 of 90

New York 22, N. Y.

January 9, 1962

Dear Jerry,

By this time, I assume you're back in Glens Falls – for if I remember correctly, you intended to return last Sunday.

Let me first tell you how much I enjoyed seeing you again, as there is no doubt that quite a number of years have elapsed since you dropped in on me.

I also want to say how much I appreciated your calling my attention to your friends' interest in paintings of the Empire Period. I gather that their time was too much taken up by other duties or chores to accompany you to my galleries – of course there is also the possibility that they were not interested in the paintings you described to them.

Be this as it may – hardly had you left that I realized I had forgotten to show you a very important sculpture of the same period,namely, a life-size ^[[marble]] bust of Empress Josephine by CHINARD, who, as you know, was the official sculptor at Napoleon's Court. In fact, this is the bust that figured at the two Salons of 1806 and 1808, and becam the property of Josephine's son, Eugène de Beauharnais, Duc de Leuchtenberg. The later pedigree is known and it was also exhibited in the great Chinard Exhibition, Louvre, (Palais de Marsan) Paris, Nov. 1909–Jan. 1910.

I am passing this on to you in case you thought that such a work of art could enter into the decoration scheme of your friends. To my knowledge, this piece is unique in the United States.

Should you have a few moments to spare, do let me hear about the comments made following your visit here and the paintings you had seen. Needless to add that such information will be held by me in strict confidence.

With renewed appreciation of your good visit, and with all best wishes,

Sincerely yours,

Germain Seligman

Mr. Joseph ^[[J.]] Dodge
c/o Hyde Collection
161 Warren Street
Glens Falls, N. Y.

^[[GS]]
[[sideways along the right margin]]
^[[J. Dodge]]
[[/sideways along the right margin]]






















Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.