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GS/M

February 15th, 1935.

Gentlemen:

On February 7th I sent you the following cable:

"Can offer without giving you definite option full length Romney Lady Broughton One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars two Rembrandts each One Hundred Thousand Dollars Full length Earl Warwick VanDyke One Hundred Twenty Thousand All Morgan Collection Immediate action needed"

It has just occurred to me that most probably you did not have the catalogue of the Morgan Collection and that it would be therefore extremely difficult for you to know what picture I was referring to when I mentioned "Lady Broughton". The more so, as in the book on "Romney" by Ward & Roberts, the portrait of Lady Broughton is referred to as "Mrs. Scott Jackson".

I am therefore forwarding to you a photograph of "Lady Broughton" made from the catalogue, with the description taken from the same book. She is mentioned in the book as Mrs. Scott Jackson, as she only became Lady Broughton when she remarried after the death of her first husband.

The sale of the paintings and works of art from the Morgan Collection has been discontinued and I am in no position to say whether this is only temporary or whether Mr. Morgan has definitely decided not to sell any more of his treasures.

As a consequence, from the list of paintings I cabled you, the only one still available is the portrait of the beautiful Lady Broughton. The rest are not available. However, should Mr.Morgan's decision be only a temporary one, I will be in a position to offer to you - if and when and as they would come on the market, the following pictures:

REMBRANDT - "Nicholas Ruts"
REMBRANDT - "Portrait of the artist"
VAN DYCK  - "Earl of Warwick"
RAEBURN   - "Miss Ross"
VIGEE LE-BRUN - "Marquise de Laborde"
PATER - "Scènes de genre" (pair)
CUYP  -  Large landscape with personages.

(The sale of the first........
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