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most felt in the American past. This is an area of grass and trees.  Tourists come here to photograph the monuments and to read the inscriptions. Few others are around, however, for the area is surrounded by major roads bearing heavy traffic. [[underlined]] This is an isolated focal point. [[/underlined]]

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^[[WHAT DOES THIS IMPLY ABOUT SUCCESS OR FAILURE OF R. CITY?]] 
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The residents of Resurrection City came from all over the country, but most from rural [[strikethrough]] Marks, [[/strikethrough]] Mississippi [[strikethrough]] , [[/strikethrough]] and from the large cities of the Northeast and Midwest. A few, most of the whites, came from the Appalachian highlands. They were of all ages, but mostly they were young. There were Indians, whites and Puerto Ricans among them, but mostly they were blacks. They put together small shelters from 
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^[[ | TIE TO OTHER MS.]] 
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components prefabricated by others friendly to the Campaign. Their numbers grew during the first two weeks to around 3,000 people, with hundreds more housed temporarily in churches and schools in suburban Washington. Then, steadily, the population declined until there were only about 500 left. [[strikethrough]] The decline was sometimes blamed on rain and sometimes on poor organization.  Part of it, however, was inevitable, for many participants had to go back to jobs or families.  But, just as no one ever knew how many were in the City, no one could say how many had come for only 2 weeks. [[/strikethrough]] ^[[AND [[strikethough]] Then [[/strikethrough]] FINALLY THESE [[strikethrough]] too also left [[/strikethrough]] LAST RESIDENTS WERE REMOVED, AND THE AREA BECAME GRASS AND TREES ONCE MORE.]] [[/in orange]]

^[[ORGANIZATIONAL PROBLEMS GREW WITH OCCUPANCY ]] [[ARROW LEADING TO operating organization]]
[[underlined]] OPERATING ORGANIZATION [[/underlined]] The City was there as a symbol, and the primary role of its inhabitants was thought of as [[underlined]] being there [[/underlined]]; their secondary role was attending demonstrations. [[underlined]] Living in the City was thought to be third. [[/underlined]] The organization for operating the City reflected these priorities, 
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^[[CLARIFY IN RELATION TO "BEING THERE"]] [[/right margin]]

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