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2    OMAHA INDIANS.

17. Um-pa-tim-ga x Big Elk, 14 acres
18. Ma-wah-dah-ne x Henry Cline, 28 acres.
19. Frederick Merrick, 13 1/2 acres.
20. x Matthew Tyndal (captain police), 27 acres.
21. Tah-ha-zhinga x Badger, 15 acres.
22. Noah Samis, 15 acres.
23. Joseph Lepuoburch (La flesche), 40 acres.
24. x Edward Esau (police), 22 acres.
25. Na-zair-duzze x Dwight, 2 acres.
26. Louis Saunsoci, 45 acres.
27. Ma-ste-an-zee, x 16 acres.
28. x Phillip Sheridan, 12 acres.
29. x Blackbird Sheridan, 15 acres.
30. William Provost, 30 acres.
31. He-ba-zhor x Oliver Mitchell, 14 acres.
32. Wah-sin-sin-de, x Samson Gilpin, 10 acres.
33. Num-ba-moni, x Charles Webster, 9 acres.
34. Shu-shing-ga, x, 20 acres.
35. x John Pilcher, 30 acres.
36. Fred. Cayon, 15 acres.
37. Sin-de-hah-hah x, 45 acres.
38. J. M. Spuyer, (John Springer), 22 acres.
39. Hun-gah-te x (Big Omaha,) 14 acres.
40. William Tyndall (2d sergeant police), 20 acres.
41. Tah-waugh-gar-a-ghinga x Cyrus Blackbird, 25 acres.
42. Uriah Merrick.
43. Ma-ga-tah x Joseph Cox, 10 acres.
44. Wah-ga-a-sha x Luke Cox.
45. Ega-hun-ga-sha x David Wells, 10 acres.
46. Gah-e-va-zhe x Walter Morris, 10 acres.
47. Ta-hoo-tom-bee x Charles Robinson, 15 acres. 
48. Thomas McCauley, 30 acres.
49. En-la-bee x George Miller, 20 acres.
50. David Stbler (Stabler).
51. Nebraska x, 25 acres.
52. 7 1/2 acres.
53. 20 acres.

1. Kah-a-num-ba (Two Crows) Lewis Morris.- Full blood. Has claim No. 315. Broke 7 acres, eight years ago. Has 18 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands. Raises wheat, corn, potatoes, vegetables, garden fruit. Planted apple-trees and timber. Built frame-house six years ago, paid money and ponies for it. Has bought some farming implements, and received from government. Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens, turkeys. Supports 6 persons. Sixty years old. A chief. He was one of seven Indians who twenty-five years ago clubbed together, each one contributing $2, and bought a plow, the first one they had ever used. He has suffered much from the loss of cows and horses stolen by Winnebagoes — 2 cows, 16 horses; this has hampered his farming. His remarks in full Appendix.

 2. Dou-ba-moni, Harrison McCauley- Full blood. Has claim No. 232. Broke 4 acres 5 years ago. Has 16 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands. Raises wheat, corn, potatoes, vegetables, garden fruit. Planted apple and cherry trees, and timber. Built dugout 4 years ago. Has bought farming implements, and received from government. Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens. Supports 4 persons. About 45 years old.

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     OMAHA INDIANS.              3

A chief. Worked on the bottom-lands ten years ago. Remarks in full in Appendix.

3. Segro-numga, George Grant.- Full blood. Has claim No. 317. Broke 9 acres 5 years ago. Has 21 acres under cultivation, not including hay fields. Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables, garden fruit. Planted apple trees and timber. Built mud lodge, cattle-sheds, corn-cribs, &c. Has bought farming implements, and received from government. Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens, turkeys. Supports 5 persons. About 47 years old. Is now in the United States Indian police service. He was one of the seven who twenty five years ago contributed to the purchase of the plow. He says:

Although I have no children, I have worked hard on my land so that I should not go round begging. I thought the land was on my own, so I went to work and cultivated it. Now I have found out it is not my own, and this makes me stop. I am afraid if I should build a house and spend money on it I would lose it, if the government should move the Indians from this land. Three times I have cut wood to build a house. Each time the agent told me the government wished to build me a house. Every time my wood has lain and rotted, and now I feel ashamed when I hear an agent telling me such things. * * * God knows I am telling the truth in all this. It may be for something very wrong that the Indians have done that God is punishing us so now. * * I want a title to my land; I want a house that is my own.

4. To-oh-ka-hah. Arthur Ramsey.- Full blood. Has claim No. 220. Broke five acres six years ago. Has 32 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands. Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables, melons. Built log house, bought windows and doors. Has bought farming implements and machines, and received from government. Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens. Supports six persons. About forty-seven years old. Is now in United States Indian-police service. Has suffered from having horses stolen by Winnebagoes. He says:

I belong to the citizen's party. I was one of its originators. We want to become citizens. We wish to have laws like the white men, to have courts to appeal to, and to have good titles to our lands. * * * I have always wished this from the first time I thought over it. * * It seems to me as though the Indians had not strength; they have no horses, only ponies; it is all they can do to move on a little. * * It is as if Indians were left out in the winter. This year we have made nothing, our crops were so poor, but it is God's will.

5. Wa-jepa, Ezra Freemont.- Full blood. Has claim No.235. Broke 10 acres five years ago. Has 55 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands. Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables, garden fruits. Planted apple and cherry trees and timber. Built frame-house, painted and papered; paid for it in ponies and money; built outbuildings, &c. Has bought farming implements. Was one of three Indians to purchase a reaper. Contributed $50. Received from government. Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens, turkeys, ducks. Supports nine persons. About forty years old. He says:

Before I began to farm I was just a wild Indian, doing as I pleased, going round the country looking for death. * * We have no government on the reserve. We have trouble all the time, which we would not have if we had government and law. We want these. We are right among the white people, and as we have no law we can't get along very well. There are persons living on the reserve who have certificates of allotment; they believe that the land is theirs, and that they can always keep it. I know differently. I know that the certificates are not good. I want a title to my land, then the land will be mine. If the government does not give to us titles I do not know what we are going to do. I went on my farm with my certificate. I believed the land was mine. I have found out the land is not mine, that the government can take it away. We are going to ask for our titles. As long as the government does not give them, we will ask until the government gets tired. We won't stop asking till we get our titles.
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