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8     OMAHA INDIANS.

who bought the plow twenty-five years ago.  He bought other implements, and oxen, at that time.  He started a farm twenty-two years ago, on the bottom-land; had it fenced; formed a village.  Each family lived in a house.  He, for himself, built a large frame, house, finished with plaster, painted, and furnished.  Was at one time a trader.  Was head chief for some years.  Deposed politically.  (Remarks in full in appendix.)

24. Han-de-mony, Edward Esau. — Full blood.  Has claim No. 68.  Broke 7 acres six years.  Has 22 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables.  Planted apple trees.  Built dugout three years ago.  Outbuildings.  Bought implements; received from government.  Has ponies, cow, pigs, chickens.  Supports six persons.  About forty years old.  Is in the United States Indian police service.  Has suffered from fire and other disasters.  He says:

When I was a boy I saw much game and buffalo, and the animals my forefathers used to live upon, but now all are gone.  Where I once saw the animals I now see houses, and white men cultivating the land, and I see that this is better.  I ought long ago to have tried to work like the white man; but for several years I have been trying, and perhaps in the future I can do much better for myself and my friends.  *  *  I want a title for my land.  I am troubled about it, for I am not sure I can have the land if I do not get a title.  *  *  In the morning I get up and look at my fields, and I wish that God may help me to do better with my land and let it be my own.

25. Na-zin-duzze, Dwight. — Full blood.  Works on a claim.  Broke 12 acres five years ago.  Has 12 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables.  Lives in a tent.  Bought tools; received implements from government.  Has ponies; lost cow last summer.  He says:

I work on a piece of land, and it is as though it did not belong to me.  I want a title.

26. Louis Saunsoci. — Half French.  Has claim No. 254.  Has 45 acres under cultivation, not including hay field.  Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables.  Government built houses; he hauled timber.  Had American horses; lost by disease.  Cow.  Supports ____ persons.  About sixty years old.  Has been interpreter to Otoes and Omahas for several years.  Has suffered severely from loss of eyesight.  Had other disasters.  He says:

I want a title to my farm.

27. Ma-sta-an-zee. — Full blood.  Has a claim.  Broke 6 acres five years ago.  Has 16 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables.  Planted apple trees.  Built mud-lodge three years ago, sheds, &c.  Received implements from government.  Has ponies, cows, chickens.  Supports seven persons.  About thirty years old.  He says:

I want title for my land.  It will then be well for me.

28. Phillip Sheriden. — Full blood.  Has a claim.  Has 12 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises corn, wheat.  Received implements from the government.  Has ponies, cows.  Supports six persons.  About twenty-four years old.  He does all the work on his father-in-law's farm--about 30 acres--and lives with him.  He says:

I have not been able to settle on my claim on account of my father-in-law, but I am going to build a house on it and live there, and I want a title to my land that I may have a permanent home.

29. Blackbird Sheriden. — Full blood.  Has a claim.  Broke it six years ago.  Raises corn, wheat, potatoes.  Planted fruit trees and timber.

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OMAHA INDIANS.     9   

Built log-house; paid carpenter $60.  Outbuildings.  Bought implements, and received from government.  Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens.  Supports seven persons.  About twenty-six years old.  Also works upon his father's land--24 acres.  He says:

I know how good it is to work.  I want a title to my farm that it may be secure to me

30. William Provost. — Half French.  Has a claim.  Broke land three years ago.  Has 30 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises, wheat, corn, potatoes, vegetables, garden fruits.  Planted timber.  Built a log and box house; sheds.  Bought implements, and received from government.  Has American horses, ponies, cows, pigs, chickens.  Supports seven persons.  About twenty-six years old.  He says:

I want to get a title to my lands.

31. He-ba-zhoo, Oliver Mitchell. — Full-blood.  Has claim No. 253.  Father (dead) broke it eleven years ago.  Has 14 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands. Raises wheat, corn.  Planted fruit trees.  Lives in a tent.  Built sheds.  Received implements from government.  Has pony, cow, pigs, chickens.  Supports four persons.  About twenty-three years old.  He says:

I will be very glad to get a title to my farm.

32. Wah-sin-sin-de, Sampson Gilpin. — Full blood.  Has claim No. 29.  Father (dead) broke it twelve years ago.  Has 10 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands; raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables.  Planted apple and cherry trees, timber.  Built log house five years ago, outbuildings.  Bought tools, &c.  Received implements from government.  Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens.  Supports eight persons.  Twenty-three years old; has had responsibility since quite a youth.  Has worked.  He says:

Now it is as though we had no homes.  Years ago white people told me to go to work and make a home.  I have tried, and done the best I could, but I cannot do as the white man does.  I am not so strong.  If I can get a title to my farm I shall try more and more to do as my white brothers do.

33. Num-ba-moni, Charles Webster. — Full blood.  Has a claim.  Broke 5 acres seven years ago.  Has 9 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises wheat, corn, potatoes, vegetables, melons.  Planted apple and cherry trees, and timber.  Built log house; bought some materials; sheds.  Has ponies, cows, chickens.  Bought implements; received from government.  Supports eight persons.  Thirty-five years old.  He says:

I hope we will get titles to the lands on which we have worked, that this may be our home always.

34. Shu-shurg-ga, Prairie Chicken. — Full blood. Has a claim. Broken 10 acres nine years. ago.  Has 20 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises wheat, corn, potatoes, vegetables.  Planted apple trees, timber, grape-vines.  Built frame-house and dug-out; paid for it; sheds.  Bought implements; and received from government.  Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens, ducks.  Supports five persons.  About fifty years old; a chief.  He says:

I have worked on my land, and as I look at the hills I think; if any one should come and tell me to go away; I know no place to go to.  Here my father lived; here I have worked and tried to make a home.  I think I could only stand here on my land till I was pushed off.  It makes my heart sad to think this could ever be done.  I wish I could have a title to my land.  It seems to me that the government cannot refuse to give me a title.  If I could get a title to my farm then I would feel happy and could work harder.

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