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12    OMAHA INDIANS

46. Gah-e-bazhe, Walter Morris. —  Full blood. Has a claim. Broke 5 acres four years ago. Has 10 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands. Raises wheat and corn. Will build a house next spring; lives with father. Received implements from government. Has ponies, cow. Supports three persons. Twenty-six years old. He says:

I want a title to my claim, so that I can have a home that is my own. 

47. Ta-hoom-tom-be, Charles Robinson. — Full blood. Has a claim. Broke land three years ago. Has 15 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands. Raises wheat and corn. Will build house on his claim; lives with father. Has pony. Supports three persons. Twenty-eight years old. He says:

I want to get a title to my claim, that the land may be mine. 

48. Thos. McCauley--Full blood. Has a claim. Has 30 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands. Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables, melons. Planted apple and cherry trees. Built frame-house three years ago; bought the materials. Received implements from governmnet. Has American horses, cost $250--cows, pigs, chickens Supports five persons. About thirty three years old. He learned carpenter's trade at agency seven years ago; is now the head carpenter. He says: 

We ought to have titles to our lands. * * * We were born here. We ought to stay here. * * * I have heard there are some people who would try to move us away.* * * We did move away from Ohio. We kept on moving to the north and we have got enough of moving. * * * There are some people who try to make money in this world. They try to kill the Indians by moving them away to some bad place where they can't get along. If we are moved away we shall die poor. When the last day comes we shall see those men who tried to kill the Indians, and that is the time those fellows will see what they have done, and they will feel bad. I hope God will help us!

49. En-labee, George Miller. — Full blood.  Has a claim.  Broke 8 acres five years ago.  Has 20 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables.  Planted apple trees; lives with father.  Received implements from government.  Has ponies.  Supports three persons.  Twenty-six years old.  He says:

I would like to receive a title to the land which I have worked.

50. David Stabler. — Full blood.  Has a claim.  Broke land this year.  Built a house last fall.  Has pony, cow, and calf.  Supports four persons.  About twenty-seven years old.  Has worked at his trade, and for his father on his farm.  Learned the carpenter trade; is now assistant carpenter.  He says:

I wish a title to my claim, that I may have a secure home for myself.

51. Nebraska. — Full blood.  Has claim.  Father broke land eight years ago.  Has 25 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables.  Planted apple and cherry trees.  Frame house.  Father built and paid for it.  Outbuildings.  Received implements from government.  Has horses, pony, cows, pigs, chickens.  Supports eleven persons.  Twenty-four years old.  Father died a year ago.  He is eldest son, and cares for family.  He says:

I want a title to my father's land where I have worked, and where I have always lived.  The last year has been a bad one.  The crops failed, and I have been sick.  I shall feel easier and shall work with more heart when I have a title to the land.

52. Frank Saunsoci. — One-quarter French.  Has a claim.  Broke 7 1/2 acres three years ago.  Has 7 1/2 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises wheat, corn.  Received implements from the government.

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OMAHA INDIANS.      13

Has American horse, and pony.  Supports three persons.  Twenty-five years old.  He works his father's land.  Is the farmer at the government school.  Has charge of garden and crops.  He says:

I want a title to my land that I may make a home.  I want to feel sure that my children can have a home.  I can improve my land more when I have a better team.  I want to have the law here that the Indians may advance.  I have to work over 60 acres.

53.  Anslee White. — Full blood.  Has a claim.  Broke 5 acres seven years ago.  Has 20 acres under cultivation, not including hay lands.  Raises corn, wheat, potatoes, vegetables.  Planted fruit trees.  Built log house; outbuildings.  Received implements from government.  Has ponies, cows, pigs, chickens.  Supports six persons.  About thirty-three years old.  He is assistant government farmer.  He says:

I want a title to my land, so that no one can take it away from me.  I want it secure to my children.  I have cultivated my land to make it my home, and I want my children to have it after me.  I did think the land was mine, but now I am convinced the land is not my own.  I want a title, so that I may never have to leave the land.  I want law.  I want it to be here just the same as it is among the white people.  I can't go back to the old ways.  If I had a good span of horses, no white man should beat me at working on a farm.

APPENDIX.

1. — Remarks of Kah-a-num-ba.  (Two Crows.)

It is now about six years since the Poncas were removed to the Indian territory and ever since that time we have been wanting titles to our lands.  We have been afraid that one day we should be taken from our lands, as the Poncas were.  We want titles to our lands, so that we can hold our farms and stay on them.  For this reason we have asked the government to give us titles.  White men have told us that if we only "occupy" the land we will surely be moved, as were the Poncas.  Our agent, some years ago, Mr. Vorr, helped us.  He told us to go to work, and he would write to Washington and ask that titles be given to us.  When I was in Washington last summer I told the department that we wanted titles; that we were worried about our lands.  I was told that titles should be given us, and that it should be so fixed that no one could sell his land for 25 years, and that this regulation should be so made that no one could break it.  If this can be done, and we can have titles, we will work harder than we have done, for we will not be worried.  There are some Omahas who have not sense enough to see the good that titles to our lands will bring us.  We ask the government to grant to each one who has worked, and who deserves it, a title to his land.  We want titles, for now the land is not our own.  We want it for our own, that we and our children may live and work here.  There are some men who have not signed this petition.  When the Omahas first went upon claims these men were then willing to ask for titles, but they have turned back because they could not have their own way and control the men who wished to go farward.  We want to advance toward law.  We look to the future and think of our children, and what will be best for them.

2. — Remarks of Douba-moni.

There was a time when I was like the old men who do not think, and are not troubled.  When I was like them it seemed as though I should fall at every step I took.  Since I began to think, and have joined the party to which the men belong who desire to become citizens, it seems as though I can stand up.  The road our father's walked in is gone; the game is all gone; the white people are all about us.  There is no use in any Indian thinking of the old ways; he must now go to work as the white man does.  We want titles to our lands that the land may be secure to our children.  When we die we shall feel easy in our minds if we know the land will belong to our children, and that they will have the benefit of our work.  There are some Omahas who do not yet care for titles.  We desire the government to give titles to those who ask for them, and in this way let us apart from those who do not want to work, and let us go on and try to become like the white people.  We are willing the others should do as they please, but we are not willing that they should keep us from getting titles to our lands.  Our children would suffer even a greater wrong than

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