Viewing page 17 of 24

[[stamped]] [[underlined]]DEADLINE EXTENDED![[/underlined]] [[/stamped]]

ART IN AMERICA
CANNONDALE, CONNECTCUT

MAY ISSUE - featuring ART AND INDUSTRY
Guest-edited by Eloise and Otto Spaeth

We consider our May issue - featuring ART AND INDUSTRY, guest-edited by Eloise and Otto Spaeth - the liveliest and most interesting to date.  We believe that if you will glance at titles of articles and names of authors listed below, you will agree:

GUEST EDITORIAL - ART AND INDUSTRY by Eloise Spaeth
ART AND BUSINESS PATRON by Russell Lynes
MEET ME AT THE MATISSES, MAGGIE by Bernice Fitz-Gibbon
THE UNDERWOOD PROJECT by Hans van Weeren-Griek
PREVIEW OF THE GENERAL MOTORS RESEARCH CENTER by John McAndrew
ART AT META-MOLD by Benjamin Barkin
THE ART DEALER AND INDUSTRY by Daniel Wildenstein
A PROPOSAL FOR HOTEL ART by Otto Spaeth

Also: PROFILE OF H.F. duPONT by Alice Winchester
ART IN GLASS - STIEGEL TO STEUBEN by Helen S. McKearin
THE SILVERSMITHS' ART IN AMERICA by Kathryn C. Buhler
GALLERY NOTES - SOME NEW DIRECTIONS FOR ESTABLISHED 
ARTISTS by Dorothy Seckler

Most worthy of your attention as a 1956 advertiser, is a [[underlined]]new advertising bonus:[[/underlined]] with each single advertisement we will list you, without any additional charge, and for a full year, in our new [[underlined]]CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY OF DEALERS[[/underlined]]which is indexed on the title page of each issue for convenient reference.  See the sample enclosed, published in our February issue.

Don't delay - if we receive your contract by return mail we can still include your ad in the May issue - which will automatically entitle you to a listing in our CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY OF DEALERS for a full year's issues. (Please send us your copy within the next week).

Note:  Our page size - and ad size - is larger than it was in 1955.

[[margin]] ^[[Art in America]] [[/margin]]
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.