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[[2 page advertisement]]

Our passion for engineering a true year-round convertible is evident from the top down.

[[image - color photograph a man in a convertible driving on a highway]]

Double layered top. Leather-trimmed seats. Power, heated mirros. 2.5 liter V6 engine. Anti-lock brakes. Modified double-wishbone suspension. Six-way power driver's seat. Remote Keyless Entry System. 150-watt Infinity[[registered symbol]] Sound System. Most trunk space of any convertible. 1.800.CHRYSLER or wwww.chrysler.com 

Presenting the 2000 Chrysler Sebring JXL Competing proof that a convertible can be designed to perform well in any season, regardless of the situation at hand. If you revel in the exhilaration of top down motoring, this car is obviously for you. Rather head north for a winter weekend away? We've got you covered there too. Because the Chrysler Sebring Convertible is engineered to be driven 365 days a year. One of the many reasons it won Strategic Vision's 1999 Total Quality Award[[registered trademark]] for "Best Ownership Experience" in its class.* That makes three years in a row. Clear indication why Sebring has been America's best-selling convertible four years straight. A reign other convertible makers just wish would go away. For info, call or stop by online (year-round, of course).

*Sebring won in 1997. 1998 (tie) and 1999. Strategic Vision's 1999 Vehicle Experience Study[[registered symbol]] surveyed 33,760 Oct-Nov. new vehicle buyers of 200+ models after the first 90 days of ownership Sebring was the winner in the convertible under $30,000 class. Infinity is a registered trademark of Infinity Systems, Inc.

[[image - logo of chrysler car company]]
ENGINEERED TO BE GREATE CARS
CHRYSLER SEBRING

Buyers of 200+ models after the first 90 days of ownership. Sebring was the winner in the convertibles under $30,000 class. Infinity is a 
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