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ON THE AISLE. with Harry Haun 

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[[caption]] color photograph of Marin Mazzie and Brian Stokes Mitchell go into their act at the Kiss Me, Kate rehearsal [[/caption]]

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[[caption]] From I.: Amy Spanger, Mitchell, Mazzie and Michael Berresse take a break during rehearsals.[[/caption]]

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[[caption]] Swingin' trio: Laura Benanti, Everett Bradley and Ann Hampton Callaway. [[/caption]]

PHOTOS BY AUBREY REUBEN

HERE COME THE HYPHENATES—The theatrical season is off and dancing like dervishes, much of it the work of four women who've just earned their hyphens and reached the rarefied ranks of directors-choreographers. 

[[image - black square]] Two cases-in-point: Saturday Night, with Fever and without. ARLENE PHILLIPS has transplanted her London version of Saturday Night Fever to the Minskoff. and KATHLEEN MARSHALL turns hyphenate—on just plain Saturday Night at The Second Stage—as soon as she and director MICHEAL BLAKEMORE get Kiss Me, Kate up and operative at the Martin Beck. "A heavy-duty dancing show," she calls Kate. "What is great about it is that is has this classical musical structure of a big ensemble number followed by a ballad followed by a comic number followed by a duet—there's a great range of numbers—and we're so lucky to have this company." To name Names: BRIAN STOKES MITCHELL, MARIN MAZZIE, AMY SPANGER, MICHEAL BERRESSE, ADRIANA LENOX, STANLEY WAYNE MATHIS, LEE WILKOF, MICHEAL MULHEREN and RON HOLGATE. 

[[image - black square]]"It's been a long time coming," says LYNNE TAYLER-CORBETT of the hyphenated status she's acquiring next month, taking Swing! to the St. James. "We're not going to define swing because it has to be on a theatrical stage. It's changed. We're trying to make it something you can enjoy while sitting down, not standing in a circle, clapping your hands. Swing is a state of mind. Those kids who got out on the floor didn't have music degrees or dance educations. They invented what they saw around them. They were like cameras. Swing is an American folk art." Making their Broadway bows with this new-hyphenate-in-town: ANN HAMPTON CALLAWAY, EVERETT BRADLEY and CASEY MACGILL. 

[[image - black square]]. Welcoming SUSAN STROMAN to Club Hyphenate via Contact at the Mitzi Newhouse, were critical cheers (palm leaves, in the case of The Time's Ben Brantley). In the last and most praised of the three pieces, she moves her ensemble to an eclectic song-score. "The songs are the songs the main character would think is swing but isn't. You'd never swing dance to 'Simply Irresistible,' but we do." Sharing Stroman's raves: KAREN ZIEMBA, BOYD GAINES, DEBORAH YATES and JASON ANTOON.

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