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     Next morning, May 2nd, we were examined. The officer in charge, a very agreeable man, was a cavalry captain named Troup Miller. We were to be notified later about the action taken. We went back to Nashville that afternoon. As I recall, I went out to my father's and back to Carthage on Sunday.
     A few days later lists of the successful applicants were published in the newspapers. My name was among them, also those of Sam Felts and Willis West, old high school acquaintances from Ashland City, and David Lee, son of a lawyer in Carthage. These were [[strikethrough]] all fro [/strikethrough]] the only men accepted from those places. I received official notification, with orders to report at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga (at Chickamauga Park) May 10th.
     The school year was not over until about the 20th. A patriotic fever reigned, however, and the school board readily permitted me to give my examinations early and leave. Full pay was given for remaining time. I believe that, although newspaper announcement of the accepted list was made about the 10th, I did not receive orders until about noon the 9th. I I had only an hour or so in which to catch the train. So I threw a few clothes into a suitcase, asked Jule Fisher to have some one pack the rest of my things and send them to Ashland City, and left. Some time that night I reached Chattanooga. I stayed at The Read House, and next morning went out to Fort Oglethorpe on one of the rubberneck buses carrying tourists through Chickamauga Park.
     The buildings of the officers' training camps were new frame barracks, of hasty and rough construction, a few hundred yards south of the station at the end of the car line from
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