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then enlisted and achieved a commission from the ranks. He was therefore somewhat older than the West Point graduates of his rank.
     Aside from the group of friends already mentioned, I remember from the 8th battery, as more or less good friends, Herbert Sessions, an instructor from the Citadel at Charleston. He was a spare chap, a military martinet, and I suspect a good soldier. Also Dick Manigault, who had in an amusing degree the peculiar accent and inflection characteristic of Charlestonians; Chappell, a Christian Scientist from North Carolina; Dick, a dapper young Citadel graduate; MacIvor, from upstate South Carolina; Stribling, a young engineer from Clemson College; Sidney Farnsworth, a Princeton man from Memphis; a bow legged young Jew named Hexter, from Chicago, who had been a cavalryman in the National Guard and was one of our best horesemen; Henry Poague, an instructor from V.M.I., and Barringer, a student from the same school.
     A day or two after the battery was organized, news came that the artillery units were all to be sent to some place in the southwest- I believe Fort Sam Houston, at San Antonio,- for training. We packed our belongings one afternoon, preparing to entrain early the following morning. That night, however, the original order was cancelled and we stayed at Chickamuaga Park.
     By this time, David Lee, my fellow Carthaginian, had been eliminated at the second physical examination. Shortly afterward orders came to weed out such remaining cadets as were considered undesirable for the reserve officers corps. Willis West was sent home. Sam Felts was also dropped, but went directly to Colonel Slocum and in a 
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