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254                        The Crisis

an amalgamated force of black and white students realistically facing these problems."

Even the most conservative person could not help but admit that something is taking place among Negro youth - something that has never occurred before.  This "new spirit," which Langston Hughes prophetically wrote in 1934 would have to be put in the majority of Negro schools by the students themselves if any hope is to come from the colleges, is now quite evident.  Witness the peace strikes and assemblies that took place April twenty-second in such conservative and reactionary colleges as Hampton Institute, Morehouse College, Spelman College, Johnson C. Smith, and several others. These were new centers of interest that added their activity to the veterans at Howard and Virginia Union, while students of five nations joined hands in a determined effort to unite for peace and balk at fascist tendencies brought on by the present economic crisis.

Born out of stark reality and dire necessity the ideology and program of the youth section is bound to penetrate into every corner of Negro life where youth gathers.  The paradox of an older generation singing "Happy Am I" in the face of starvation or depending on a deaf and far off God to create a job in a closed-down factory no longer baffles the younger generation.  Breaking with tradition which "fetters soul and will," youth is facing the challenge of modern society in increasing numbers and not only demanding a hearing, but forgoing the youth section of the National Negro Congress, and a new weapon capable of attacking and mastering the problems confronting them.

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[[images: photo of man in graduation cap and gown on left, a woman in photo on right]]
[[caption]] James Oliver West, Jr. (left), summa cum laude, Virginia Union University; and Nettie Allie Petty, summa cum laude, Claflin University. [[/caption]]

No. 1 Graduate
(Continued from page 239)

at the world from his more than six feet, seems to have all the qualities to come out on top in his chosen profession and in the battle for life.  He is a worthy successor to the revered Colonel Charles Young, the last man who licked West Point and the army in spite of having a dark skin. — R.W.

College Graduates

Earl L. Sasser, for the past eight years head of the department of English, Prairie View State College, Texas, is the first colored student to receive the degree of doctor of philosophy from the department of English at Cornell university.  The subject of his thesis was "The Fiction of Robert Buchanan."  Dr. Sasser was born in Goldsboro, N. C., and did his undergraduate work at Shaw university where he was graduated in 1926.

Edgar A. Hammons received his A.B. from Millikin college in Decatur, Ill., and Miss Mary Jane Johnson of Assumption high school won a scholarship to the State Normal College.  Charles L. Livingston won a scholarship to Millikin college.

Rayford Logan, of the Atlanta university faculty, received his Ph.D. from Harvard.

NOTICE
A few pictures of graduates and notes upon their achievements could not be accommodated this month and will appear in the September issue.

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