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[[underline]] Page 4    GODMAN FIELD BEACON   Monday, January 28, 1946 [[/underline]]

Cpl Jas "Red" Watson, BEACON Reporter in SWPAC 
Writes of Former Godman EM in Southwest Pacific
MANILA
Up in San Fernando la Union, 165 miles from Manila, is a former member of the 619th BS. He is Sgt Louis Black, who bit the Red Apple—for three more years, and should now be in the States on re-enlistment furlough.
Here in my own outfit which has changed titles three times within the same number of months (from 1865th, 1871st and now 869th), are several former Godmanites. They are: Sgt Filmore Ayres, now on the high seas bound for home; Sgt James A Carter, from the old 477th Bomb Group and later "C" Squad, who is now our chief radio operator in Communications.
T/5 Vernon C Lewis will be remembered by all the fellows back there as a member of the "Busy Bees" ork, with whom he played a hot trumpet. Vernon is still playing it hot and sometimes sweet with the 869 AAF Band, which is under the baton of Thomas "Fats" Waller—not the old boy himself, but Junior. And they really jump!
T/5 Freddy Klass, of "C", is on Okinawa. Cpl Granville Hill, of 618th and 619th, just came across the pond a few weeks ago and is now on Leyte. The last fellow I went to locate was Cpl Willie Clement, of the 619th, who is an auto-mechanic with the 2015th QM Trucking Company. They're camped about three miles on the outskirts of Manila.
We don't need passes to go any place. Beer is 20 centavos a bittle, about a dime in American money, and smokes are 10 centavos a pack. The favorite night spots atre the "B-29 Club" and "Happy-Go-Lucky Tavern", not to leave out the famous "Brown Bomber Club", the "Ambassador" and the "Bamboo" niteries.
All soldiers are called "Joe" by the natives. The young ladies over here are indeed beautiful and velly friendly.
I know you have read a lot about the demonstrations being held over here for demobilization. Will send all the dope after we meet Mr. Patterson. You see I'm one of the representatives from my outfit. 
—James "Red" Watson

617th TWIN-ENGINE TATTLE
By Noble Lee
Flash!! The 617th Bomb Sqd upset the 99th Pursuit Sqd. Score—617th, 33; 99th, 13. Coach Dewberry with his assistants, Lt Hillary, Sgts Harris and Hill are out to win all inter cage tilts. Men on the team who will be up points are—center, Lester Carey; forwards, Lee Perry and Henry Moore; guards, Clarence Simmons and Charles Brown. Lots of substitutes who are equally as well.
RECREATION: Attention ! All bowlers. Sgt Norvel Curtis bowls an average of 180 and his most recent high score was 246 (much competition) Curtis and Cpl Charles Dixon, of the 602nd. Engineers, bowl with the Louisville Woodpeckers each Wednesday.
Last Monday nite's dance brought surprising results. T/Sgt F B Pinkard placed all of his medicine aside and was at the dance with bells on. Looked very much improved from his illnes. (Huba, Huba, Huba)
EDUCATION: Anyone going overseas who thinks he might get to France, see Sgt William Reese. He says he will teach French for one dollar a lesson and guarantee that you will know French by the time he earns fifty dollars. (No mercenary attachments.)
Influenced by the reminiscence of their pre-war school days, Sgt Jerry Hampton, Sgt Howard Smith, Cpl Harold Jones, and Pfc Fletcher Greene are attempting to add to their academic knowledge by attending the typing classes at Fort Knox.
Several GIs were approached unexpectedly over the week-end by a Louisville Defender photographer. Each was asked what he thought of racial progress, or other wise, in the post-war days of the future. Among those who expressed their opinions were—Sgts Norvel W Curtis and Edward O'Belton of the 617th BS, Cpl Charles G Dixon of the 602nd Engineers and Cpl Morris Hutchins of the 99th FS. Their opinions appeared in the Louisville Defender, Friday, January 25th.

Make The Most Of What Your Have Is 
Philosophy of New 477th Executive Officer
Lt Col Nelson S Brooks recently took over duties as Executive Officer of the 477th Composite Group.
[[image: head shot of man]]
Lt Col Nelson S Brooks
Young, dynamic Col Brooks, holder of seven battle stars and the Presidential Unit Citation, was Executive Officer of the much lauded 332nd Fighter Group in Europe. 
Always the studious type, he was given recognition in the National Honor Society during high school days. Reflecting true form, Col Brooks earned his BS degree cum laude from Tuskegee. He managed the basketball team at school.
Being one of the first six Negroes appointed as Aviation Cadets, Col Brooks received his commission in December of 1941. 
This rangy, determined personality hails from Illinois and has long advocated making the most out of whatever you have. This philosophy is reflected in those who work under him.

CORONET SALUTES
GENERAL ARNOLD
"Happy"—that's General Arnold's nickname because of his famous smile. But the General's real nature shows in his walk, declares Major Clifford Moore in the February CORONET. For Arnold has a determined stride, with set jaw and half-clenched hands. He's a fighter—and he's been fighting for our safety for almost forty years.
As a young West Point graduate, Arnold became in June, 1911, the country's fourth military man assigned to fly. He was brilliant. Twice he won the coveted airman's award, the Mackay Trophy, for aviation leadership.
Then, in 1925, continues the CORONET article, came the trial of General Billy Mitchell for breaking discipline by criticizing the neglect of avitation by his superiors. Arnold knew Mitchell was right, and he fought whole-heartedly in his defense. After Mitchell was suspended and reduced in rank, he publicly acclaimed Arnold as a great Air Corps leader whose convictions and courage would help to bring
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