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[[image - man and woman in front of a theater]]

In London, you can see the sights all year and see the plays all year. But now, you'll see both for less on Air-India's 8-day theatre tour. Roundtrip, $304.

With its plays, revues, opera, dance, clubs, and casinos, London is one of the few cities in the world where the night can shine as brightly as the day.
An Air-India $304 Curtaintime Tour of London begins with a serene Air-India New York-London roundtrip flight. You'll also get a London hotel with private bath, daily Continental breakfast, airport-hotel transfers, sightseeing, 4 theatre tickets, entree to a chic London casino, discounts at specially selected shops, and a resident host.
You'll agree that Air-India give you the best show in the air, just as its tours give you the best shows in London.
Tours depart N.Y. through March 31, 1974, (no departures Dec. 15 through Jan. 5). Prices based on GIT economy, roundtrip fare, double occupancy in hotels. If 10-person group not attained, alternate dates arranged. Upon government approval, fares may increase Jan. 1. Reservations must be made 15 days in advance.

[[dotted box]]Please send me more information about your Air-India theatre tours.

[[checkbox]] London [[checkbox]] London-Vienna [[checkbox]] London-Moscow-Leningrad PB-12
Name ____________
Address ____________
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AIR-INDIA
666 5th Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10022[[/dotted box]]

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STAFF FOR THE PRODUCERS
GENERAL MANAGER ..... HELEN RICHARDS
GENERAL PRESS REPRESENTATIVES ..... JAY BERNSTEIN PUBLI RELATIONS
Company Manager ..... William Stewart
Stage Managers ..... Bert Wood, Bob Bernard, Stan Page
Assistant to Mr. Adler ..... James Sarnoff
Assistant to Miss Leporska ..... Dallas Johann
Assistant to Mr. Guthrie (Costumes) ..... Ben Benson
Assistant to Mr. Gleason ..... Patrika Brown
Assistant to the Producers ..... Ruth Kalkstein
Assistant to the General Manager ..... Steven Suskin
Production Assistant ..... Chris Adler
Master Carpenters ..... Dick Miller, George Ribentish
Assistant Electricians ..... Chris Fadigan, James O'Neill, Ray Britton
Assistant Propertyman ..... Tom Ciaccio
Dance Captain ..... Dallas Johann
Music Preparation Supervisors ..... Mathilde Pincus, Al Miller
Casting ..... Martin Gage, Janice Nevins
Attorneys ..... Cotton, Weissberg, Hartnick & Yamin
Accountants ..... Schaffel & Pliskow
Advertising ..... Jeff Ash, Blaine Thompson
Printing Consultant ..... Harold Friedlander
Music Publisher ..... Frank Music Corp.
Merchandising ..... Delta Consultants

CREDITS
DIPLOMAT PAJAMAS BY HOST
Scenery by Feller Scenic Studio. Lighting by Four Star Stage Lighting. Furniture by A. & S. Galleries. Hosiery by Jessie Zimmer. Wigs by Hann Wig Co. Sewing Machines courtesy of the Singer Co. Typewriter from Smith/Corona/Marchand Div., SCM Corp. Electric coffee maker and cooking utensils from Mirro Aluminum. Telephones from New York Telephone Co. Eyeglass by Riviera Eyewear. Luggage courtesy of Samsonite Corp. Leather desk set from A. & M. Leatherlines, Inc. Products of the Coca-Cola Co. used. Beach balls by Ideal Toy Co. Cannister set by Beautywear Div., Lincoln Metal Products. Baseball equipment by Spalding. Toolbox & hand tools courtesy Stanley Tool Works. Kodak Instamatic Cameras used. Beer Courtesy of Miller Brewing Co. Corelle dinnerware used. Fishing equipment from Old Pal Div. of Woodstream Corp. Watches from the Waltham Watch Co. L'Eggs Pantyhouse from Hosiery Div. Hanes Corp. Footwear by Uniroyal, Inc. Dance shoes by Capezio Ballet Makers. Electric clothes dryer courtesy of the Hoover Co. Tosti Asti Spumante used.
The Producers wish to thank THE FLAGSTAFF CORP. for their assistance.

STAFF FOR LUNT-FONTANNE THEATRE
General Manager ..... ARTHUR RUBIN
Manager ..... Leonard Soloway
Treasurer ..... Henry Bonis
Assistant Treasurers ..... Roy Deveney, Iris Geller, Harry Pearl
Carpenter ..... Merle Runkle
Electrician ..... William Cuddy
Propertyman ..... William Sorenson
Orchestra Manager ..... Alfones Maiorca
House Physician ..... Dr. Rudolph Bono

The taking of pictures or the operating of any recording device in this theatre is strictly prohibited.

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by Ellen Cohn

[[image - self-portrait line drawing of Al Hirschfeld]]

HIRSCHFELD

Sitting in the homely barber chair that points him at his drawing board, dressed for comfort in a copen blue jumpsuit and dark brown slippers, Al Hirschfeld today, looks more like a department store Santa waiting for the day after Thanksgiving than an artist - the one whose unique drawings of theatrical personalities (sometimes film and television as well) render certain issues of The New York Times more than usually fit to print.
It is Hirschfeld's uncanny eye and unerring hand that assure that a few swooshing lines represent not merely movement or flight, but the very specific flight of Mary Martin as Peter Pan. You need never have heard of Merman, Garland, or Ethel Waters; seen Bolger, Muni, or Buddy Hackett to respond to Hirschfeld's vigorous portraits of them. They communicate instantly. Initially, you are moved by their sheer vitality; then you smile at your power of recognition - forgetting that the power is Hirschfeld's.
"I once did a drawing of Garry Moore and I just dashed it off. I had no difficulty with it because I knew exactly what he looked like. After I had finished it the woman who worked for us came by, looked at it, and said, 'Buster Keaton.' Well, I was at it for weeks. No matter what I came up with they all saw Keaton. One day, Dolly looked at a drawing Id done, said 'Garry Moore,' and that was it. I still don't know why...it's mysterious."
Hirschfeld finds them all mysterious but Moore was one of the very few that ever game him trouble. His way of working is simple. He attends some rehearsals, out-
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