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National Women's Trade Union League of America
Endorsed by the American Federation of Labor and The Trades and Labor Congress of Canada

Room 610, 166 West Washington Street, Chicago  
Telephone Franklin 3281

[[image - circular seal showing two women shaking hands, surrounded by the words NATIONAL WOMEN'S TRADE UNION LEAGUE ; standing on either side of a tablet containing the words THE EIGHT HOUR DAY A LIVING WAGE TO GUARD THE HOME 1903 ]]
PATENTED JUNE 22, 1909
[[image - oval seal containing the words ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL CHICAGO]] 236
OFFICIAL MAGAZINE
LIFE AND LABOR
EDITOR, S. M. FRANKLIN
[[line]]
CABLE ADDRESS
LIFELABOR, CHICAGO
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EDITOR
MRS. JAMES A. FIELD

OFFICERS
MRS. RAYMOND ROBINS - PRESIDENT
MISS MELINDA SCOTT - VICE-PRESIDENT
UNITED HAT TRIMMERS UNION
43 EAST TWENTY-SECOND STREET, NEW YORK
MISS EMMA STEGHAGEN - SEC'Y-TREAS.
BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS UNION
EXECUTIVE BOARD
MISS MABEL GILLESPIE
MISS S. M. FRANKLIN
MISS LOUISA MITTELSTADT - TIN FOILERS
MISS AGNES NESTOR - GLOVE WORKERS
MISS NELLE A. QUICK - BINDERY WOMEN
MISS ROSE SCHNEIDERMAN
CLOTH HAT AND CAP MAKERS

LOCAL LEAGUES
BOSTON
NEW YORK
CHICAGO
ST. LOUIS
SPRINGFIELD, ILL.
KANSAS CITY, MO.
BALTIMORE
DENVER
PHILADELPHIA
LOS ANGELES

SIXTH BIENNIAL CONVENTION
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
JUNE, 1917
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[[stamped]] ARCHIVES OF AMERICAN ART [[/stamped]]

March 30, 1916.

Miss Dorothea Dreier,
99 Central Avenue,
Montclair,
New Jersey.

Dearest Dad:-

The Executive Board of the National Women's Trade Union League met in Chicago, January 22, 23 and 24, 1916. For the first time since the organization of the League eleven years ago, we were in the position to plan constructively for a full year's work. I cannot begin to tell you what it meant to all of us to be able to look beyone the immediate tomorrow in our work and to lay the foundations on which to build in the coming years.

It was because of your understanding and your faith in us and in the work we are trying to do that we were able at that meeting to so plan. And, it is because of our deep appreciation for this co-operation that we want you to know something of the plans agreed upon at the January meeting and of the work undertaken.

We arranged for scholarships in our Training School for Active Workers in the Labor Movement for Sadie Kossibuski, a young Polish girl, a pottery worker by trade, of Trenton, New Jersey; for Mrs. Schwartz, a printer of New York City; for Mrs. Cora Hogan, a glove worker by trade of Gloversville, New York; for Leone Baker, a boot and shoe worker by trade of Boston; and for May Shannon, a bindery girl of St. Louis.

We also voted to extend the scholarship of Agnes Burns of Murphysboro, Illinois - daughter and sister of miners/ Agnes Burns came to us the first of October and was immediately taken seriously ill with an attack of appendictis. This necessitated a very grave operation and weeks of convalescence. Through the co-operation of the Women's Trade Union League of Chicago and the leading women physicians who serve on the Health Committee, we were able to give Miss Burns the services of the surgeon, all hospital care and the care in the convalescent home without cost to any of us. Agnes Burns is now better than she has ever been in her life. She is a very remarkably gifted

[[preprinted]] UNION MADE PAPER [[/preprinted]]

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