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{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
...get much in the way of archaeological evidence for early craft, early ships, and to do what was available in the times required for these contacts. The history of sailing in the, in the Western Pacific is one that goes back to, about, some of the earliest accounts we have are about 4000, 400 A.D. There's nothing really, that gives any knowledge of sailing before the time of Christ. The matter is one of for speculation. The, and here's a case where we, where we, we don't have any written records, we must depend entirely on speculation.

[00:47:43]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
And it seems to me that it is basically incorrect to think that important navigational techniques began with - at the time we have written records. That's of course obviously, an error we might fall into. We know that in 400 A.D. that people were sailing very widely in the Southeast Asia. There's one account of the pilgrim from China who went to India and sailed back from the mouth of the Ganges to Java on a very large boat. A boat that was made regular passage in that direction from Java to Canton China...

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