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00:10:14
00:13:10
00:10:14

Transcription: [00:10:14]
{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
I should tell you one story before that. You know I was drafted in the army, and came to Peenemünde as a buck private.

{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld "}
OK, that's where. I should actually fill this in, completely, we got off track. When was, OK, so you came back from Japan on leave, was it?

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
On leave for five months.

[00:10:41]
{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld "}
OK, and which month, just before. Oh, you said just before the attack on the Soviet Union.

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
It was June. In June. On the 10th of June I was still in Moscow, and the war between Germany and Russia broke out 12 days later.


[00:10:53]
{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld "}
So you just came back when the war

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
I just came back, and, you know, of course, you could see while being in the train some thing is going on here. And, my brother was in Berlin and he asked me, what do you think of that situation?


[00:11:10]
{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
I said, that's plain bluff. I had been told the war is imminent, in the train, by two people who were traveling with diplomatic information to the East, you know, even to South America. And they had told me the war is imminent, and when we were in Moscow.

{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld "}
Germans told you this?

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
Germans. They told me, well, we still can make it. They were afraid we couldn't make it anymore, and they told us in Moscow, we still can make it.

[00:11:50]
And I didn't believe that. Said because. And I told them so. If Hitler does that, he has lost the war, and I don't believe that he would do that. And the same thing I told my brother, I cannot, I cannot believe it. He's not that dumb. Well, OK.

[00:12:09]
{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld "}
So. Yeah.

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
I went then to Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt, to get coal chemistry, because I was in the coal business, but I was a mechanical engineer and I wanted to, to know the chemical side of the coal too.

[00:12:31]
So, that's what I did in these five months, and after the five months were over I got my first draft order. And I went back to the company which had sent me to Japan, and they said, no, no, we can, we can get the cancellation of that draft order, and they did.

[00:12:49]
I got the second one, they cancelled it, and the third one, you know, the other side said, you cannot say he is absolutely necessary, a necessity here because he wasn't here before, so you don't have a reason to come out with that argument. So.

{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld "}
That would have been at the end of 1941?

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
That was in

[00:13:10]

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