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00:10:55
00:14:12
00:10:55

Transcription: [00:10:55]

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
There was a very energetic manager who dictated, and properly I could only say, so I was surprised. That plant was in very good condition.
[00:11:13]

{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld"}
Did more Peenemünders have contact with that facility than the other one? Or was it just the manager?
[00:11:24]

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
[[crosstalk]] The same.
[00:11:22]

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
It was just the manager. It was the manager.
[00:11:26]

{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld"}
That brings up the question--
[00:11:30]

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
Just an example to show you what kind of nonsense a manager can do when you work with liquid oxygen or gaseous oxygen coming from the tank.
[00:11:43]
{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
This is a very, very cold gas, and you cannot take steel. You have to take copper, because steel or iron gets so brittle that with one hammer blow you can destroy the piping.
[00:12:00]
{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
And we had an accident at Schlier very early where one of those lines broke and then they had an explosion, because the manager said, "No, we do not take copper. Copper is so scarce in Germany we cannot use it." And he took steel without knowing how dangerous it was.
[00:12:22]

{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld"}
So you must have had a problem with those operations then in effect they were created new without sufficient knowledge of all your experience at Peenemünde, and they were largely staffed without any people from Peenemünde.
[00:12:41]

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
[[crosstalk]] Yeah. That's right.
[00:12:34]

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
The bar was hardly anyone in, here in that case one man, but he himself didn't have enough experience.
[00:12:49]

{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld"}
Now, maybe you can make more sense of me how the whole production process and testing of the engines was done on a mass production basis.
[00:13:03]
{SPEAKER name="Michael Neufeld"}
Did, were the combustion chambers still made in Breslau or a whole bunch of different places?
[00:13:11]

{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
As far as I remember they were manufactured in Breslau, and I am not clear how many or which percentage was manufactured, for example, at [[?]].
[00:13:30]
{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
There was, maybe later on when Tessman is coming we can ask him that question. I told him I would give him the reign.
[00:13:41]
{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
So when we are through I can do that and we can ask him that question: Where was the manufacturing done of combustion chambers?
{SPEAKER name="Karl Heimberg"}
[00:13:51]
And that I don't believe all the combustion chambers were manufactured especially after this started with the high production figures that Linke-Hofmann was the name of the company in Breslau could manufacture them all, but the point I was making, they all had to be tested.
[00:14:12]

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