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Transcription: [00:05:14]
{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
you still get it with the oldies

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Yeah well see the, I think the original impression on me was that was, was one of being I was confronted with something that was profound.
[00:05:20]
You know, I'm not speaking about the actual artwork. I didn't see the actual artwork until for about 10 years later.
[00:05:26]
It's the. I saw a tiny postage stamp size reproduction

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Jesus
[00:05:31]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
in a magazine and I knew from right then that there was something going on there.

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
And that drew you
[00:05:35]


{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
And so, for that reason magazine reproductions and paintings and paintings, and I think an artist can be influenced by just flipping through art magazines. You know.
[00:05:46]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Totally

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
And you can get, you can drive true protein power from imagery by seeing a reproduction of the size of a postage stamp as opposed to confronting the so-called real thing.
[00:05:58]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
I don't think it is that important to, to confront the real thing.

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
You know. It's interesting you know it's the reverse of what most people contend, you know.
[00:06:06]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Well, imagery is just so up for grabs in modern communication that ah.
[00:06:13]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Well, the thing is that it just moves so fast now and you are seeing that in relationship without image painting or new expressionist painting it just going by, we don't even have generations now, its just going back weeks.
[00:06:24]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Hmm.

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
And

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
But it's all subject to the same sort of style cycle, and most

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Oh yeah

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
people are really out of style.
[00:06:30]
Well it's all cyclical, it's truly cyclical. And, ah.
[00:06:33]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Oh yeah. Excuse me. What's bothering me about it now is that it is all contextual.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
That's kind of the mature attitude to take about it.
[00:06:39]
You know, it's that all these things do go in and out and you know the world's greatest artist have been forgotten through the centuries, ah, da Vinci included.
[00:06:51]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Do you see yourself painting more again now?
[00:06:55]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Yes

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
There seems to be a sense of returning back to it

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Yeah, yeah, no no I am actually painting, painting on canvas.
[00:07:03]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Actively painting? Actually painting.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Yeah. Hmm hmm.
[00:07:05]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Right

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
With traditional oil paints
[00:07:08]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
What a? Why?
[00:07:12]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Ah, well I

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
All of a sudden.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
guess lushness of contact or something.
[00:07:18]

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