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00:11:34
00:13:35
00:11:34

Transcription: [00:11:34]
{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
They begin to make more sense because they are a little, it's a more serious intent.
[00:11:38]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Oh sure.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
There are just so many of them.
[00:11:42]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
[[laughter]] Yeah. Surely you wouldn't of have done so many [[laughter]]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Right, right.

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Yeah right on [[?]] level
[00:11:45]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
So, so, in a strange way, ah the collection, of the entire collection of them begins to say, um, lose it's initial comic impact.
[00:11:56]
Because then they become a little more serious, and so I think I reached a point of well - it's body of work, body of work, body of work, why should I add to it.
[00:12:06]
Why should I add another one to it. So I saw that I had sorta rounded out that statement, and I had just [[cutting sound]] cut it off, and that's ah where I stand today

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
And maybe at some point the impulse will come up again of it's own fruition rather than
[00:12:19]


{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
It could

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
to say you really you have to be, there should be a continuum, there will be just a day, hey, Jesus.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Time for another, yeah.

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Yeah exactly. And that's the way it ought to be.
[00:12:28]
It oughten to be - Oh, God, it's been three years since I've done one, whatever that is. But, it's funny how much attention those books have had, because they are unassuming books in that sense. You know it's funny how that got to be such a thing, it's a very interesting that.
[00:12:48]
I don't suppose it's anything anybody ever could calculate, you know it must have been weird to be sitting around on it's own you know [[laughter]] forever.
[00:12:59]


{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Yeah, yeah. And so, I noticed there was a long run in the late 60s, there was a, there were other artists. There was a whole movement in New York.
[00:13:10]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Oh yeah, oh yeah. It went right by like crazy

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
You know, the conceptual movement in New York, I mean, did not include me. I was not considered a conceptual artist
[00:13:17]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
That's what I was going to ask you.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
until much later. And so

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
That never sticks by me
[00:13:21]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Well, possibly not.

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
It had a thing for it's own sake.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Some of the artists are there some are not there.
[00:13:26]
It seems to me a conceptual artist are, by terms of the definition would be someone who had not created an actual, a type of work, of physical work.

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