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00:13:39
00:16:19
00:13:39

Transcription: [00:13:39]
{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
But I again, I was not thought of as being conceptual until much later. And they have conceptual shows and with works that, you know, mine probably would have been bed fellowed with.
[00:13:55]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Hmm [[affirmition]]

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
But was not. I think the fact that I grew up in L.A.

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Oh sure

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Or my career took place in LA. As I look at it now, it was beneficial.
[00:14:07]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Yeah, I think it is hard to realize in when it is going on. But I am sure it is true, and I think it has been true for a number of people but I think of escaping a movement, or escaping a being moment in time and place is a terrific advantage to them because then you become a one-person movement,
[00:14:23]


{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Hmm [[affirmative]]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
in a funny kind of way, and you don't have this thing of being stuck being carried along like so much baggage, you know. In other words a chance of looking at it fresh. And, there's a danger of being an LA artist.
[00:14:35]
Which is it's own danger. You know all that kind of ... surfing and all that kinds of stuff.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Yeah.
[00:14:42]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
But that's a different phenomena and I don't think it is as dangerous in a funny way as the connotative thing of being AN actual expressionist, or being A pop artist, or being A conceptualist which has all that - but at a given point in time a movement goes on.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Yeah
[00:14:58]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Stops into eternity.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
I think some artist actually benefit by being labeled because then they are really thought of as being part of a hot movement and they are considered really hot and that they have an "ism". So label equals hot to a lot of artists.
[00:15:11]


{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Yeah, but "ism's" go by so quick.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
They always did. And I guess they always will.

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
And then there you are.
[00:15:18]


{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
It's kind of curious you know. Most people who are interested in about art are interested in the curiosity of the magnitude of [[chuckle]] movements.
[00:15:27]

{SPEAKER name="Jan Butterfield"}
Oh, but that was the whole pointedless thing - of newness isn't hard. They are holding newness as such a simplistic way to look at it.
[00:15:38]
Because there are movements and old. It wouldn't work. There is old and there is two. And it has to be that kind of resin that hooks on to history, it's a [[?]]. It just floats around loose you know, that whole insistence on innovation is so dangerous, in my mind.
[00:15:54]
I think I've read a lot of... That's always been my quarrel with art forums, that thing of breeding a certain amount of of, you know, academic formalist attitudes in people in such a way that the
[00:16:07]
- it was too structured, it was too rigid, it had to do with that kind of thing, it didn't allow for the error and the conformed error whatever - but that's gone by the boards now.

{SPEAKER name="Ed Ruscha"}
Well, yeah, I mean

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