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00:39:19
00:41:27
00:39:19

Transcription: [00:39:19]
{SPEAKER name="William Ennis/John Ennis (interpreter)"}
All that time I decided, I don't wanna play baseball. I uh, I decided to use an excuse. I said I'm deaf mom and

[00:39:29]
I don't know if I can get along with them out there. I'm not so sure if I can play that well. Changed my mind, I wanna go home.

[00:39:35]
Mom said "what? Wait a minute get out you're gonna go play baseball with your brother get out." No, no. "Your brother can sign."

[00:39:42]
"Yeah I know that, I know he can sign," but well my mother decided to just put her foot up and push me out of the car and I fell out of the car and I said—and then she took off.

[00:39:54]
I said what? And I saw my brother stand there looking at me.
[[AUDIENCE LAUGHING]]
And I said alright, I have to do something about this, come on lets go.

[00:40:03]
So we started walking over and really thank god we, we did have a good time. We made the team and had a fantastic time there playing little league.

[00:40:11]
[[AUDIENCE LAUGHING]] [[CLAPPING]]

[00:40:18]
{SPEAKER name="Jo Radner"}
Well maybe it's a good time to start asking our audience if they have questions or experiences they wanna share.
Yes.

[00:40:28]
[[BACKGROUND NOISE, INAUDIBLE]]

[00:40:33]
{SPEAKER name="Audience Member"}
You know, it's to you, I'd like to know, mmhhm, I'd like to know with you being black, if you have special problems being deaf?
{SILENCE}

[00:40:49]
[SPEAKER name="Nathie Couthen/John Ennis (interpreter)"}
Well I consider myself deaf first, black as second, because I have a problem communicate—communicating in the first place.

[00:40:59]
So um, I hang around with the deaf, not with the blacks, because, uh, being deaf, that makes me a Deaf person. I'm in a Deaf culture, in a Deaf world. Black, uh, I can't help that either.
[[AUDIENCE LAUGHTER]]

[00:41:20]
And you know the deaf are color blind. You know that, so that didn't make, didn't make any difference to me

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