Viewing page 30 of 54

Original scanned October 1, 2002. Reduced print - for full-sized print, see Davis Box 163, Folder 14

[[newspaper clipping]]

Wednesday, July 6, 1955

[[Begin Column 1]]

3 USAF Key Officers To Confer With Chinese Gov't On Red Air Threat

Three key officers of the United States Air Force in the Far East will meet in Taipei tomorrow for top-level conferences with the Chinese Government on recent developments in this area, indicating that United States military leaders are taking a new look at the disposition of American defense forces in the Pacific, a reliable source said yesterday.

The trio includes General Lawrence S. Kuter, Commander of the Far East Air Force; Brigadier General Sory Smith, Chief of Staff of the Pacific Air Command; and Brigadier General William Lee, Commander of the 13th Air Force. Lee is flying in to Taipei from Manila today while the two others are scheduled to arrive tomorrow.
     
The source maintained that the holding of the all-important conference at this juncture shows that the military center of gravity is moving southward in the Pacific. He pointed out that the shift of emphasis to the Taiwan Strait is prompted by the rapid build up of Communist air strength along the mainland coast just opposite to Formosa, and by evidence that Peiping would not hesitate to use its air might to fight for air supremacy in this arena.

The Communist demonstrated their aggressive intentions only a few days ago when they fired upon two Chinese Government T-53 trainers and a civilian PBY in the sky over Matsu Talard. Monday, four CAF Thunderjets engaged in a fierce dog-fight with four Communist MIG's north of Double Peak Island off the Pukien Coast. In the air battle a MIG was severely damaged by CAF warplanes.

Already here are two prominent figures of the U.S. Air Force in the Far East -- Brigadier General Harold W. Grant, Deputy Commander of the Fifth Air Force and concurrently Deputy Chief of the Taiwan Liaison Center; and Brigadier General Benjamin O. Davis, Deputy Commander of the 18th Air Force and concurrently Commander of the 13th Air Force.

Judging by the posts they are holding, the sources said, it is apparent that both Grant and Davis will remain in Taiwan for some time to come directing mainly matters in connection with the air defense here. General Davis set up an advance headquarters of the 13th Air Force here upon his arrival nearly two months ago.

The two generals whose presence here also serves to prove the shift of emphasis to the Taiwan Strait, will take part in the military conference tomorrow.

A report said that General Kuter will first meet with President Chiang Kai shek before beginning the planned conferences with the Chinese Air Force authorities.

General Kuter took over command of the Far East Air Forces on June 4 from General Earl E. Partridge. The forthcoming trip will be the general's first visit to this island redoubt.

Earlier reports, which were neither confirmed nor denied by the authorities, claimed that the United States might increase its air force units deployed on Taiwan by one or two more squadrons of jet fighters in the not too distant future. General William Lee was reported to have considered the deployment of additional units on this island as a necessary step for the air defense of the Taiwan area.

Qualified observers here believe that topics to be discussed at the forthcoming conferences will center around the strengthening of both the Chinese Air Force and the U. S. Air Force units stationed on Taiwan, as well as to step up coordination between the air force units of these two nations.

General Kuter will be entertained at a cocktail party to be given by President Chiang July 8, it was learned. If time permits, General Kuter might take a trip to southern Taiwan after the scheduled conferences in order to take an on-the-spot look at the air bases there.

Both Chinese and American official quarters declined to indicate the length of the generals' stay here.

[[End Column 1]]
[[Begin Column 2]]

MRA Reception Committee Holds Final Meeting

Free China's reception committee for the world famous Moral Re-Armament Statesmen's Mission held its closing meeting yesterday afternoon. The Mission left Taipei on June 26 after a four-day crusade on this island.

The committee, headed by General Ho Ying-chin who is a member of MRA himself, discussed in yesterday's meeting whether Free China should participate in the next MRA meeting to be held in Switzerland in August.

The meeting decided in principle that the future line up, if any, of the Chinese delegation to the MRA meeting must consist of those who are genuinely interested in the MRA movement and who will work for the cause of MRA following their return from the conference.

However, no final decision on Chinese representation in the forthcoming MRA conference was reached in yesterday's meeting.

[[horizontal line]]

Korean, Brazilian Envoys Leave Taipei

Korean Ambassador Kim Hong Il and Brazilian Ambassador Labienne Salgado dos Santos left here yesterday for their respective countries on home leave.

Ambassador Kim flew to Tokyo by CAT to join his wife who was receiving medical treatment for her illness in a hospital there. They will leave Tokyo together for Seoul shortly. 

Prior to his departure from Taipei, the Korean Ambassador said his current trip has nothing whatever to do with official business.

Mr. dos Santos left for Brazil via Hongkong. He will return to his post here in September.

[[End Column 2]]
[[Begin Column 3]]      

Taiwan Wheat Output Totals 19,457,370 Kg.

The wheat production on Taiwan during the 1954/55 period totalled 19,457,370 kilograms from 17,710 hectares of land, according to preliminary investigations of the Provincial Agriculture and Forestry Department.

The average wheat production per hectare of land reached 1,530 kilograms, which exceeded the target average by 2.4 percent, the department report said.

[[horizontal line]]

Mrs. Perle Mesta Lauds Beauty of Chinese Women

"I was simply charmed with the light make-up that's used by most Chinese women. They know all the secrets of expressing natural beauty, and that is real beauty," remarked America's well-known lady diplomat Mrs. Perle Mesta before she left Taipei by CAT for Hongkong yesterday morning.

The former American Minister to Luxemburg came to Taipei on June 24 for a five-day visit. She was received by President and Madame Chiang at a tea party last Friday.

Mrs. Mesta lauded the remarkable progress she witnessed among Chinese women in Taiwan. She also paid tribute to Madame Chiang for the latter's inspiring leadership as First Lady of the nation.

Mrs. Mesta said she thought Chinese women usually got old more slowly than Western females because the former take less part in public life. She pointed out that the beauty expert's advice for physical [[debt?]] in Western countries is not always worth taking.

Asked how she had managed to keep her beauty, the popular lady diplomat replied with a smile, "Well, it's simple. I don't take a bit of alcohol. Nor do I smoke. I am an early riser, sipping only a cup fruit juice at breakfast."

[[horizontal double line]]

Classified Advertisements

50 cents per word for 1 day prepaid

(Free translation service)

Housing

FOR SALE OR RENT
Western style bungalow, sitting room, dining room, three bedrooms, flush toilet, kitchen, wooden floor, with garden at Hain Peitou, three minutes from bus terminal. Reasonable terms. Please apply 22, Chungho Street. Hain Peitou.

FOR RENT - Modern and new 2-story house, best for small family with living, dining, bath, kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2 servant quarters and all facilities. Contact: Mr. Sun from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: No. 5 Lane 62, Tainan Road, Sec. 2. Taipei.

FOR RENT - Semi foreign style house with 4 floored rooms, complete with modern facilities, garage and garden, etc. 63, Chang An Road (East), Phone 42617.

HOUSE FOR RENT - Beautiful house with fine rooms beautiful garden, flush toilet. Former Dominican. Location 22 Tainan Road Section 3.

TO LET - 2-story 7-room Western style residence with garden, newly renovated, all screened, garage, servants quarter, telephone, flush toilets and bath tub.  Good location, Phone 23297.

TO LET - All of 1st and 2nd floors. Good location. Fit for bar, office or hostel. Total building area 117,32 ping. Water, electricity, flush toilet and other modern conveniences. Please call Mr. Chen, Telephone 709, Hain Chu, Credit Society. Eastern district. Hain Chu.

[[horizontal line]]

Sales

FOR SALE -  Small outboard motor suitable Dinghy or Sampan. Telephone 42040.

FOR SALE - Refrigeration during blackout! Servel kerosene refrigerator. 9.2 cubic feet; kerosene kitchen stove, vacuum cleaner, radio-phonograph, miscellaneous electrical appliances and household effects. Grass Mountain. E-25.

AUTO FOR SALE - '52 Pontiac, Catalina Super, 2-door, hydromatic, in good condition, ins. overhauled. Tires almost new. Grass Mountain, E-25 Tel. 45155 Ext. 25

[[horizontal line]]

Employment

JOB WANTED - Young lady, English-speaking, seeks position as housekeeper for American family or as tutor teaching Mandarin. Apply Miss Mary, House 19 Alley 15, Lane 113, Chang Chung Road or China Post Box 208.

Wanted: Junior and senior accountants by large concern in Taipei. Applicants must be fully conversant in English both written and oral. Answer before 7 July 1955 in English in own handwriting and include resume of education and experience. P.O. Box 569 Taipei.

[[horizontal line]]

Miscelleneous

ANNOUNCEMENT - Taipei American School Association will meet at MAAG Chapel, Thursday July 7 at 8:00 p.m. to consider matters related to new building project. Parents are urged to attend.

[[End Column 3]]

[[horizontal double line]]

Movies Today

Great World  * Mission Over Korea *

12:10  2:00  3:30  5:40  7:30  9:20

Cosmopolitan  * Martin Luther *

12:30  2:30  4:40  7:20  9:25

International  * Deep in My Heart * 

10:35  12:45  3:00  5:10  7:25  9:40           
               
Taiwan  Chinese Picture

12:15  2:00  3:50  5:40  7:30  9:20

[[/newspaper clipping]]

Davis B012 F005 1 sh1of2

Transcription Notes:
"Miscelleneous" spelled wrong but transcribed as written.

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.