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[[SINGING]]

[00:26:12]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
Twice a week in the evenings the little boys in their familiar sailor suits perform for the guests of the hotel. With crystal clear voices and lively charm, they've won the hearts of music lovers everywhere.

[00:26:24]
[[SINGING]]

[00:26:38]
Near the choir boys — in the province of Carinthia — is the wonderfully picturesque village of Heiligenblut with the dazzling white Grossglockner, Austria's highest mountain towering above it.

[00:26:49]
Heiligenblut is where [[Friedel Dami ?]], Austria's leading mountain climbing guide lives, but in the summer he's up at the Franz-Josef-Haus where the actual climbing of the mountain begins.

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We started up the Grossglockner highway in search of Herr [[Dami ?]] — and it's one of the most famous mountain roads in Europe, considered an engineering feat.

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High up at the very top, we found the one hotel: the Franz-Josef-Haus. It's perched boldly on a rocky ledge and dramatically overlooks the Pasterze Glacier.

[00:27:22]
Here, too, we found Dami, who started telling us the wonders of climbing the Grossglockner. We explained we had only come to take pictures of him, but this to the famous climber seemed impossible to believe, and before we knew it, he was showing us all the equipment we would be using on the climb. Although we both assured him we would not be needing it.

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Undaunted, he asked when he could bring us the proper clothes for the climb. Again, we told him that mountain climbing was the last thing that either of us would ever attempt, so we would never, never get into such clothes.

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