Viewing page 14 of 26

00:30:11
00:32:12
00:30:11

Transcription: [00:30:11]
The old courthouse down at the end of the street is just around the corner from the house where the famous composer Mozart was born, and all over Salzburg one finds the name of Mozart. The Mozartplatz, or square, and has his statue in it, always with a wreath of fresh flowers laid at his feet every day.
[00:30:30]
Just off the Mozartplatz in a small back courtyard is this lovely little Baroque chapel where he used to go as a boy.
{SILENCE}

[00:30:39]
In practically every corner of the city an artist can find inspiration for his talents.
{SILENCE}

[00:30:44]
Aside from being a painter and a sculptor, Kai is an architect, a designer of stage sets for the Salzburg Festival, and movie sets in Munich. Also, he's had an exhibition of his works in Washington, DC.
{SILENCE}

[00:31:02]

A little outside of the city are the Hellbrunn palace and gardens built by still another of the Archbishops, and this one with a most unusual sense of humor. His innocent guests dining at this table were in for quite a shock!
{SILENCE}

[00:31:23]
And his sense of humor just didn't stop here, either. Inside certain palace rooms, water suddenly sprays out at you from the ceilings and walls like a shower as these sightseers are finding out.
{SILENCE}

[00:31:40]
There's one who came prepared with a rain hat.
{SILENCE}

[00:31:44]
This type fun goes on until the snow falls again.
{SILENCE}

[00:31:50]
Now the statues in the Mirabell gardens that we saw during the summer seem quite alone under the gentle snowfall.
{SILENCE}

[00:31:59]
This time of year not many tourists come to Salzburg, but these seagulls do. And the people love to tell about how for the last 20 years without fail these birds have come all the way from the North Sea to spend the winter here.

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.