Viewing page 99 of 459

[[newspaper page]]
SEPTEMBER 1, 1936     THE MOUNTAIN EMPIRE BULLETIN     PAGE THREE

ORVILLE WRIGHT SOARS 10 MINUTES IN MOTORLESS PLANE

[[article]]
EUGENE ELY IN DEATH CRASH AT MACON, GA., COUNTY FAIR
---
MACON, Ga., Oct. 19, 1911 (E.B.)-In course of an exhibition flight at the local fair grounds, shortly after 2 p.m. today, Eugene Ely, the renowned Curtiss aviator, lost control of his biplane and from an altitude of only 50 feet crashed to his death.

Earlier in the afternoon Ely had ascended to an altitude of 3,100 feet. On his second voyage he was circling the field at a low elevation when his plane wavered, dipped, then dived towards the ground.

Before the machine struck the ground Ely jumped from his seat, but did not succeed in clearing the falling plane, which was reduced to a twisted mass of wreckage.

"I lost control," Ely murmured, just before he expired. "I know I am going to die."

Was Iowan

The dead airman was born in Iowa. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. N. D. Ely, of Davenport. His father has been notified and will come to Macon for the body. Ely's wife has also been notified. She is in Hammondsport, N. Y., where she has been awaiting her husband.

Earlier this month he had made a series of exhibition flights at Davenport. A number of his friends asked him, during his engagement there, how long he intended to continue hid flying career.

"Oh, I'll do like the rest of them," Ely is said to have replied. "I'll keep it up until I am killed."

Ely had been booked to fly at the state fair here starting October 11. On one occasion, during his local appearance, he made a sensational flight in a rainstorm. He had offered to make a night flight with his aeroplane illuminated with phosphorous paint, but the fair officials refused to pay the $1000 he asked for the feat.

Started in 1910
Before becoming an aviator Ely was an automobile salesman at San Francisco. He was taught to fly by Glenn H. Curtiss, at Hammondsport, in the spring of 1910. One of his first public appearances was in August 1910 with a Curtiss exhibition team composed of James C. (Bud) Mars, Chas. F. Willard, J. A. D. McCurdy, Augustus Post and Curtiss, at the Sheepshead Bay racetrack, near Brighton Beach, N. Y. During the progress of this meet Ely flew from the track to the beach to fill a dinner engagement, and then returned to the track by air.

It was only shortly after the Sheepshead Bay meeting that Ely accomplished one of his most noted feats, a flight, made on Nov. 14, 1910, from the deck of the cruiser Birmingham, anchored in Hampton Roads.

A wooden platform 25 feet wide by 85 feet log had been erected on the deck of the Birmingham. Ely's machine was assembled and tested at the Jamestown, Va. racetrack, and transferred by lighter to the cruiser for the attempt.

The weather was unsettled, with frequent squalls of rain nearly causing a postponement of the proposed voyage. Finally a calm spell arrived, and in the midst of it the aviator sped down the slightly sloping runway, and shot over the bow.

Completed Hazardous Flight

Ely had intended to end the flight at the Norfolk Navy Yard, 30 miles distant, but as he left the Birmingham a faulty movement of a control caused the plane to shoot downward until the front wheel touched the water. With his goggles covered in spray, and fearing that the propeller might have been badly damaged by the impact with the water, the aviator, after bringing the machine to an even keel, decided to land 2 1/2 miles away at Willoughby's point.

In December [[1910]], with aviators James J. Ward and Augustus Post, Ely gave a series of exhibitions at New Orleans, then went to Los Angeles, where he represented Curtiss in an aviation meet, which was held in the latter part of the month.

Ely next appeared at San Francisco, where in January, of this year he performed a second spectacular over-water feat-a flight from the Presidio at San Francisco to the deck of the Cruiser Pennsylvania, anchored in San Francisco bay, and back to shore again. Describing the San Francisco flight Curtiss said recently:

Landed on Ship

"To check Ely's speed in landing, ropes were stretched at right angles every few feet across the runway. A sand bag was attached to the ends of each rope. As Ely descended to the platform, grabhooks attached to his landing gear caught in the ropes and dragged him to a stop.

"As soon as he had received the excited congratulations of the naval officers, Ely started off again from the Pennsylvania and flew the ten miles back to shore, where wild cheers greeted him upon landing near the camp of the 30th infantry. He was the first man to establish a connecting link between the army and the navy."

On May 27, of this year at Eureka, Ely made the first flights ever made in northern California. Thousands watched him rise to a thousand feet, and in the face of a 40-mile wind, soar over the timbered craigs and out over the breakers on the Humbolt Bay bar. In the Spring of this year, flying from Butte Montana, Ely was the first aviator to cross the summit of the Rockies.

In August he participated in the Chicago aviation meet, winning avoid crashing into a group of tents on the military reservation.
(Continued on Page 4)
[[/article]]

[[article]]

BEACHEY'S FEAT
(Continued from Page 1)
---
Russell Shaw and Melvin Marquette. Only one of the novices, Captain Bumbaugh, actually succeeded in getting into the air, and he wrecked his plane in landing after a short hop.

Four of the Wright planes were in the air at one time, on June 15. Motor trouble handicapped Aviator Hoxsey in his efforts to fly.
[[/article]]
-----
[[article]]
BROOKINS STARS
---
(Continued from Page 1)
Brookins reached an altitude of 5,000 feet and Hoxsey 6,149 feet. In an effort made a few days ago Johnstone set a new American mark by climbing to 8,471 feet.
The previous altitude record was 8,485 feet set by Chavez, in France, Sept. 8 last.
[[/article]]

[[article]]
-----
MOISANT KILLED
(Continued from Page 1)
[[cutoff]]tance of 35 feet away. He landed on his head, the force of the impact breaking his neck. Death was instantaneous.

Moisant learned to fly at the Bleriot school, at Pau, France, this summer. On August 16, last, with a passenger, he started his famous flight from Paris to London, which was completed three weeks later.

Returning to America he participated in the international aviation met held at Belmont Park in October.

[[/article]]

[[article]]
THESE FLIERS DIED GALLANTLY IN EARLY CONQUEST OF THE AIR
---
Lieut. Thomas E. Selfridge
Fort Meyer, Va.,
Sept. 17, 1909
--
Ralph Johnstone
Denver, Col.,
Nov. 17, 1910
--
Walter Archer
Salida, Col.,
Dec. 5, 1910
--
Arch Hoxsey
Los Angeles, Calif.,
Dec. 31, 1910
--
John B. Moisant
New Orleans, La.,
Dec. 31, 1910
--
Wm. G. Purves
Apr. 24, 1911
New Orleans, La.
--
Lieut. G. E. M. Kelley
San Antonio, Texas
May 10, 1911
--
A. V. Hardelle
Los Angeles, Calif.,
May 17, 1911
--
D. A. Kraemer
Chicago, Ill.,
July 13, 1911
--
William R. Badger
Chicago, Ill.,
Aug. 14, 1911
--
St. Croix Johnstone
Chicago, Ill.,
Aug. 14, 1911
--
John J. Frisbie
Norton, Kans.,
Sept. 2, 1911
--
Alexander McLeod
Sept. 4, 1911
West Pullman, Ill.
--
John W. Rosembaum
Sept. 19, 1911
Dewitt, Iowa
--
Frank Miller
Sept. 22, 1911
Dayton, Ohio
--
"Dare Devil" Castellane
Sept. 22, 1911
Mansfield, Pa.
--
Dr. Clark
Sept. 25, 1911
Nassau Blvd., N. Y.
--
Cromwell Dixon
Oct. 2, 1911,
Spokane, Wash.
--
Eugene Ely
Oct. 19, 1911
Macon, Ga.
--
Tod Shriver
Dec. 2, 1911,
Puerto Rico
--
Rutherford B. Page
Jan. 22, 1912,
Los Angeles, Calif.
--
A. L. Welch
Lieut. L. W. Hazelhurst
College Park, Md.,
March, 1912
--
C. P. Rodgers
April 3, 1912,
Long Beach, Calif.
Raymond Wheeler
--
Peter Glasser
May 13, 1912,
St. Louis, Mo.
--
Phil. O. Parmalee
June 1, 1912,
North Yakima, Wash.
--
Julia Clarke
June 17, 1912,
Springfield, Ill.
--
Harriet Quimby
A. W. Willard
July 3, 1912,
Boston, Mass.
--
Paul W. Peck
Sept.11, 1912,
Chicago, Ill.
--
Howard W. Gill
Sept. 14, 1912,
Chicago, Ill.
--
Russell Blair
Sept. 20, 1912,
Shenadock, Iowa
--
Lieut. L. C. Rockwell
Corp. Frank Scott
Sept. 28, 1912
--
Alvin Williams
Jan. 1913,
San Diego, Calif.
--
Frank Boland
Jan. 23, 1913,
Trinidad
--
Lieut. Rex Chandler
April 8, 1913,
San Diego, Calif.
--
Otto Brodie
April 19, 1913,
Chicago, Ill.
--
Herman E. Jansen
May 2, 1913
Oakland, Calif.
--
Charles Carlson
May 5, 1913,
Akron, Ohio
--
Lieut. Joseph D. Park
May 5, 1913,
Olive, Calif.
--
James Colovan
May 31, 1913,
Akron, Ohio
--
Andrew Drew
June 12, 1913,
Lima, Ohio
--
Fred F. Gardiner
June 23, 1913,
Bath, N. Y.
--
Lieut. Loren H. Call
July 8, 1913,
Houston, Texas
--
George Schmidt
Sept. 2, 1913,
Rutland, Va.
--
Lieut. Moss L. Love
Sept. 4, 1913,
San Diego, Calif.
--
Maximillian Liljenstrnad
(Max Lilie)
Sept. 15, 1913,
Galesburg, Ill.
--
Albert J. Jewell
Oct. 13, 1913,
Hempstead, L. I.
--
Lieut. Perry C. Rich
Nov. 14, 1913,
Manilla, P. I.
--
Lieut. Eric L. Ellington
Lieut. Hugh M. Kelley
Nov. 24, 1913,
San Diego, Calif.
--
F. M. Bell
Feb. 7, 1914,
--
Meridian, Miss.
Lieut. H. B. Post
Feb. 9, 1914,
San Diego, Calif.
--
Lieut. J. McC. Murray
Feb. 16, 1914,
Pensacola, Fla.
--
Chas. C. Roystone
Los Angeles, Calif.
April 28, 1914
--
H. P. Harris
Akron, Ohio
May 3, 1914
--
Percival Van Ness
Utica, N. Y.,
May 8, 1914
--
Arthur Rybitsky
Angeles Camp, Calif.
July 4, 1914
--
Charles Hibbard
Bardstown, Ky.,
Sept. 3, 1914
--
Weldon B. Cooke
Pueblo, Col.,
Sept. 16, 1914
--
Alphonse Huth
Chicago, Ill.,
Oct. 9, 1914

[[/article]]

[[article]]
DAWN OF NEW AVIATION ERA SAID IN SIGHT

[[image - sketch of a 1900 glider]]
[[caption]] "1900 GLIDER" [[/caption]]
[[2 lines]]

KITTY HAWK, N. C., Oct. 24, 1911 (E.B.)-Once more two of the Wright Brothers have come to the region of sand dunes, near here, and performed a miraculous feat of aerial navigation.

It was on Dec. 17, 1903, that Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first motor-driven aeroplane flights from the dunes. Today it was Orville Wright, aided by his brother Lorin, and an Englishman, Alexander Ogilve, who performed an even more startling feat, and thereby demonstrated man's almost complete conquest of the air.

Today it was a flight of ten minutes duration in an unpowered aeroplane that was made. The machine used was the characteristic Wright type of biplane, but without a motor. Nor were there any mechanical contrivances such as a wing flapping device, or other means, to propel the craft.

The machine merely soared in the air, taking advantage of rising currents of air, and if recent statements attributed to Wilbur Wright are any criterion, similar flights of an hour, or even longer, duration are to become commonplace in the future.

The apparatus used today is considerably improved in appearance and performance over the crude gliders with which the brothers launched their aeronautical investigations, preliminary to their power flights, in 1900, 1901, and 1902. It has a lever control, following the usual Wright practice, to wrap the wings in order to maintain balance. The spread of the wings is 32 feet and their chord 5 1/2 feet. The machine, without the operator, weighs only 145 pounds.

The Wright brothers and Ogilve arrived here on Oct. 13, set up their camp, and assembled the aeroplane. Five days later Orville made a series of short flights in the face of a 36 mile an hour wind. The longest flight was of 1 minute and 15 seconds duration. The final glide of the day ending in a fourteen foot fall, in which the glider was wrecked, but the operator uninjured.

[[/article]]
[[/newspaper page]]
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.