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THE AIRSHIP HAS A NARROW ESCAPE
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Tent Burns on the Laughlin Ranch and Wind Blows Aeroplane to Safety
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Misfortunes never come singly. Fred J. Wiseman and M. Peters, who spent several months building one of the finest airships ever built in the country, feel the truism of the old saying.

Sunday afternoon the tent which housed their bi-plane on the Laughlin ranch, at Mark West, was destroyed by fire, together with all their tools, the air-charts and valuable papers containing measurements and other data, some engine parts, a big roll of cloth used only for airships, and some personal effects. The airship, which was fortunately moored outside, escaped serious injury.

It was the strong wind that blew the airship to a place of safety in the big pasture field after the fire had burned the strands of rope holding the machine to the outside poles of the tent. The fire caught the cloth on the rear plane and scorched it. Fortunately the fire was noticed and the flames consuming the cloth were extinguished. 

The loss is naturally a very heavy one on the builders, but nothing daunting they are going to repair the damage, get another new roll of cloth and new tools, replace their papers and in short, will not let the disaster of Sunday afternoon, shortly after 5 o'clock stop them in their determination to make of their airship the greatest success possible.  All their friends sympathize with them in their loss
[[torn]] their pluck.
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WISEMAN AIMS TO RISE IN THE WORLD
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Well Known Driver Quits Automobiling and Will Devote Time and Attention to Aeronautics
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Fred Wiseman, well known in this city as a daring automobilists, has severed his connection with the firm of W. J. Leavitt & Company of San Francisco, and will henceforth devote his time and attention to aeronautics.

In conjunction with a number of other enthusiasts, Mr. Wiseman is now engaged in the construction of a Farmin biplane, which is expected will be completed inside of a couple of months. A new and improved motor is a feature expected to work wonders in connection with the machine now in process of construction.

Associated with Mr. Wiseman are several Santa Rosans, who have likewise become interested in the new form of locomotion. They claim to have a machine that will surprise all comers, and say their motor has many advantages over any now in use.
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AIRSHIP TO FLY THIS AFTERNOON
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Attractive Program Arranged for the Track This Afternoon and Great Crowd Expected
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The festivities of the past few days of pleasure will terminate this afternoon at the track. The special feature announced is the one that will bring the crowds, the flight by Fred Wiseman and M. Peters in their own bi-plane, about which so much has been said and written and which is tersely described elsewhere in this morning's paper.
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PETALUMA TO SANTA ROSA IN AIRSHIP
 MAY BE NEXT VENTURE
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The rebuilding of the Wiseman airship, which was damaged in the accident at Reno, Nev., is in progress in Petaluma, and it will not be long before Fred Wiseman will again take his seat amid the wings to fly aloft.

"This airship sport has automobile racing licked to a frazzle," Wiseman smilingly observed to a newspaper friend in town on Sunday, when he was asked as to the feeling that came over one when mounting into the air and navigating about in space.

"I tell you one thing–that a man has a far better chance of saving himself in an airship when she commences to drop that he has in an automobile race when the wheels skid or the gear goes wrong."

Fred Wiseman has the airship spirit. He wants to fly. He says he has a machine now that will fly like a bird. There is no longer any question about it, and but for that squall of wind across the Reno race track there would have been no limit to the height to which he could have attained.

There will be no flourish of trumpets prior to what Fred Wiseman hopes will be his next accomplishment–a flight from Petaluma to Santa Rosa. That will be a great event, not only in the record of Fred Wiseman, but in aviation in this section.
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NAPA DAILY JOURNAL, NAPA, NAPA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.
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NAVIGATING THE AIR
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Santa Rosa Inventors Complete Aeroplane and Make Successful Flights.
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Santa Rosa Press-Democrat, Apr. 24.

Following several minor tests the Wiseman-Peters bi-plane made a perfect flight on Friday night in the big pasture field at the Laughlin ranch at Mark West, several miles from this city, where it has been assembled since the middle of March. Not only was the bi-plane built in Sonoma county, but the genius of Santa Rosa boys has achieved a triumph. They have a machine that "wont stay on the ground," and in the air is perfectly under control of the aviator.

As stated Friday night was really the first big test, the others having been principally to tension the mechanism. Twice on Friday night aviators Wiseman and Peters circled the big field, soaring to a height of fifty feet, not attempting to fly high, however. This is but a foretaste of what may be expected. People in the neighborhood saw something Friday night they had never seen before, and are loud in their praise of the achievement of the energetic young men who have done so nobly.

Will Fly at Carnival Time.
Thousands of people will be delighted and interested to know that the Wiseman-Peters bi-plane will fly here at Rose Carnival time, and will be a special feature of entertainment for Sunday afternoon, May 8, the day following the fiesta. In the meantime other tests will be made, and it is especially requested that people refrain from going to the Laughlin ranch to see the machine as in doing so they will only be hindering the finishing touches. Naturally everybody is excited and interested but the aviators and designers say they cannot explain things to the people just now as they have no time. People will have plenty of opportunity to inspect the machine as it will be on public exhibition here during carnival week and all parts will be then explained.

Worked Industriously
It was on October 17, 1909, that Wiseman and Peters got their heads together and commenced the actual construction of the bi-plane, which is now an assured fact, and is claimed by experts to be possibly the most perfect one in existence. At the time both were employed in the automobile business of J. W. Leavitt & Co. of San Francisco, both fearless auto racers, and both well skilled in mechanical art. From October until January 1, of the present year, they worked with automobiles during the day and spent their nights evolving their ideas in connection with the bi-plane and in the manufacture of parts.  In January they severed their connection with the automobile business to devote their entire attention to the construction of their airship.

They took in the aviation meets in San Francisco and Los Angeles, examined carefully and intelligently the mechanism of the machines used there, and upon a comparison of notes determined to manufacture a bi-plane which would eclipse any of the great machines used in flights in either of those cities.

Their knowledge of machinery and years of experience in the auto business was just the thing, particularly in the matter of engine construction.  A San Francisco firm turned out the engine they designed. Then Wiseman and Peters rebuilt it and triumphed in the construction of an engine developing fifty horse-power, and weighing 148 pounds, including propeller, [[torn]] dual Rosch [[torn]]
will not break at 4,000 pounds pres- of 1,940 pounds, and the largest one sure. Before they got the kind of turnbuckle they wanted for their machine Wiseman and Peters made hundreds of them and threw them away.

The wheels are manufactured after the most approved style of workmanship for the purpose for which they are intended.

In the rear of the bi-plane a light skid is used. The skid is of hickory which on the rear kite acts as wheels.

The plane in front works alternately with the plane in the rear kite. In case the driver wishes to rise he raises the plane in front and that drops the one in the rear and the machine ascends. In balancing on a curb or turn or in a current of air he manipulates the controls with his shoulders. 

The seat is situated in front of the engine. There is an attachment in reach of the foot of the aviator by which he can control the height, area of flight and speed.

The total weight of the Wiseman-Peters bi-plane is 670 pounds. Five gallons of gasoline and three gallons of oil are sufficient for a twenty-mile flight.

All California Material.
In the construction of the Wiseman-Peters bi-plane all the material used is California product with the exception of the cloth and propeller. The cloth and propeller were secured in a foreign country. In the selection of the wood used over thirty thousand feet of lumber was gone over and the selection made. Fred Wiseman has had entire charge of the construction work. In conjunction with Mr. Peters and with the assistance of Don Prentiss they have carried out their design to a triumphant finish and Santa Rosa can well be proud of the fact that a Santa Rosa boy has figured so prominently in the invention. Ben Noonan is the general manager and treasurer of the company; Wiseman and Peters are aviators, and Don Prentiss is the secretary of the concern. All are deserving of the warmest congratulations.

Wiseman and Peters are in San Francisco now selecting lumber for the construction of another bi-plane for use in case of accident.

Second American Machine.
Another important feature about the Wiseman-Peters bi-plane is that it is practically the second American machine built outside of the Wright and Curtiss machines.
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THE FRENCH CAPITAL.
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Paris is the Mecca of foreigners. They come from all parts of the world to enjoy life in the great metropolis, and the yearly income from this source alone approximates $600,000,000. Along with this item the earnings of French capitalists on their investments in the securities and properties of other countries amounts to fully $250,000,000 yearly. On the other side of the account is the adverse balance of trade, which in 1907 amounted to $120,000,000. Deduct this outgo from her income of $850,000,000 and it leaves France with $730,000,000 to the good. Instead of getting an income of $600,000,000 from foreign tourists, the United States pays out at least $150,000,000 for the expenses of American tourists abroad. Again instead of drawing $250,000,000 [[torn]]
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Transcription Notes:
Isn't this a duplicate page? janetjschoor@aol.com

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