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THE BOSTON GLOBE - TUES SEPTEMBER 5, 1911. 

[[Column 1]]
[[Advertisement]]
Boston  Brockton  Beverly  Hyde Park  Lynn  Worcester

50c for Your Old Straw Hat
Provided You Buy Your New Fall Hat From Us Before September 15

We're after your hat trade, and we believe that one purchase here will make you a steady customer. Plenty of "Fuzzy Boys" here as well as Derbies and smooth Soft Hats, of course. We guarantee every one. The red-hot favorites are:

Guyers Hats at $3.00
and the $2.50 Hat known as the 
Kennedy Special $1.95
[[line]]

On STETSON HATS at $3.50 we can no longer allow 50c for old hats. You should have come Saturday.
[[line]]

Open Saturday Evenings

Kennedy's
30-38 Summer Street
A Little Out of the Way---But It Pays to Walk
[[/advertisement]]

LIEUT MILLING, WINNER OF THE BIPLANE RACE, TELLS OF FLIGHT

[[image -photo of Milling's head]]
[[/Column 1]]

[[Column 2]]
STONE AND ATWOOD HAD TO DESCEND
[[line]]

Pipe From Gasoline Tank in Machine of [[?]] Burst, Latter Unable to Maintain Altitude With [[?]]
[[image - two photos of crowds at airfield]]
[[caption]]WHERE ATWOOD AND STONE LANDED, MEDFORD.
"Top Picture Shows Stone's Monoplane, Lower Atwood's Biplane.[[/caption]]

[[line]]

Two of the aviators who engaged in the interstate flight yesterday landed in Medford within a short time of their leaving the starting point at Squantum. They were Arthur R. Stone and Harry N. Atwood. They came down on the marsh near the old Mystic turnpike within 15 minutes of each other and they lay for several hours about half a mile apart.

Stone alighted first. While over the Charlestown navy yard a pipe from the gasoline tank burst. He realized at once that he was bound to descend so he manouvred for a good place to come to the ground. He found it on the marsh just in the rear of the racing track and came gently to the grass at about 11:40.

Burgess-Wright company and to [[illegible]] of his landing. W. Starling Bur[[illegible]]
the company was also at Squantum
he accomplished Lawson at one [[illegible]]
Medford to inspect the machine.

Atwood stated that he was forc[[illegible]] make a landing because he could [[illegible]]
maintain altitude. This was due [[illegible]] additional weight which the biplane [[illegible]] to support because of the presen[[illegible]] the elder Atwood.
After leaving the aviation field [[illegible]] machine rose to a fairly good [[illegible]] Lawson, after talking with Atwoo[[illegible]] timated that the machine must [[illegible]] obtained an elevation of 1000 feet [[illegible]] passing over Boston and Charles[[illegible]] Then it began gradually to descen[[illegible]] wood made every effort to keep [[illegible]] air, but he finally saw that his [[illegible]] were useless and he looked for a place to land.

People who saw him approac[[illegible]] ground say that he came down [[illegible]]

could not have a detail of men to keep the crowd back, and half a dozen [[illegible]] with ropes and stakes were sent to the scene. They drove back the crowd, which had reached the proportions of 1000 or more, drove the stakes in the ground and roped the aviator and his machine in.

When Messrs Burgess and Lawson reached the scene a thorough examination of the engine and the machine itself was made. Lawson said that the engine was all right. Owing to the delay, however Atwood decided he would withdraw from the race, as he could not hope to finish in any sort of time.
 
It was different with Stone's monoplane. While it lay within 100 yards of the Mystic turnpike, there is a deep ditch in the marsh over which it could not be hauled to the road itself, so it had to be dismantled on the marsh and taken piece by piece to the roadway. It was then [[illegible]] to the aviator field.
[[/Column 2]]

[[Column 3]]
[[advertisement]]
C.F. Hovey &
[[line]]
WE HAVE PURCHASED A MANUFACTURER'S LOT

NEW AUTOMOBILE CO
FOR WOMEN

MADE OF HEAVY MATERIALS IN PLAID, CHECK AND STRIPE  EFFEC[[illegible]] SCOTCH. THESE COATS ARE FULL LENGTH, WITH LARGE COMFORT[[illegible]] AND ARE UP-TO-DATE MODELS IN EVERY RESPECT.

Would ordinarily sell for $29.00 and $35.00

For This Sale $15.00 and $19.00

Lot 1 - Made in checks and plaids, extreme styles in straight front and loose back, full length, with wind shield inside cuff. Regular price $29.00. Special at....$15.00

Lot 2 - Made in stripe effect [[illegible]] toning up around neck [[illegible]] inside cuffs. A most com[[illegible]] motoring. Regular p[[illegible]] $35.00. Special at...

[[line]]

Sale of Bon Ton Corse[[illegible]]

20% Discount

Twelve Styles Ranging in Price From ... $3.00 to [[illegible]]

Taken From Our Regular Stock, Not an Odd L[[illegible]]

For the people who know the Bon Ton Corsets, and for those w[[illegible]] to try them, we make this special reduction. These corsets are m[[illegible]] materials in all the newest shapes.

Expert Fitters Are in Attendance
[[line]]

5000 Atlantic Cotton Mills
Sheets and Pillow Slips

Torn and hemmed from first grade stock; priced less than previous season's reductions on this well-known manufacture.

Sheets  Special Price
90x108...77c
81x108...70c
72x108...65c
63x108...58c
90x99...70c
81x99...65c
72x99...58c
54x99...49c

Slips
45x38 1/2...16c
42x38 1/2...14c

Reduction in [[illegible]]

150 Doz. Hemmed Huckaback Towels, all linen, with red and white borders. Formerly $3.00 per doz. Now...$2.40

300 Doz. [[illegible]]
aback [[illegible]]
with red [[illegible]
borders. [[illegible]]
$3.00 per [[illegible]]

250 Doz. Hemstitched Huckaback Towel [[illegible]]
red and white borders. Formerly $6.00 [[illegible]]
Now...[[illegible]]

2000 Yards of All Linen Crash. Reduced [[illegible]]
15c per yard to....[[illegible]]

Women's Sh[[illegible]]
For Fallen Arch[[illegible]]

Made of softest kid skin, on natural, curv[[illegible]]
proper poise and tread, carrying long, flat [[illegible]]
ible sole. In Boots and Oxfords. Regular[[illegible]]
for $5.00. Special at...[[illegible]]
[[line]]

Four Specials in Colored Pett[[illegible]]
[[/advertisements]]
[[/Column 3]]

Transcription Notes:
Large crease in center disrupts narrative, right side faded/cut off. Marked the borders with "illegible"

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