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[[marginalia]] Thos. DeW. Milling, Col. AC,
[[strikethrough]] University Club,
Denver, Col. [[/strikethrough]]
The Ambassador Apts.
72 [[Cr?]] Court
San Antonio
Texas [[/marginalia]]

The Mountain Empire Bulletin, Jacumba, Calif.  Sec. 562 P. L. & R.   25c
Vol. II  No. 9  Sept. 1, 1936

Presents
The Early Bird Review [[stamp]]
[double line]]

[[five column headline]]
LINCOLN BEACHEY DEFIES NIAGRA'S MAELSTROM
[[/five column headline]]
[[line]]

[[image: line drawing cross section side view of a biplane tilted downward, with pilot at controls, and small startled bird observing]]
[[caption: Beachey's New "Headless" Curtiss Biplane]]

[[two cancelled US postage stamps]]

[[col. 1]]
H. BEACHEY IS BADLY HURT IN FALL
[[line]]
BATTLE CREEK, Mich., Aug. 4, 1912 (E. B.)—In an aeroplane crash, which terminated an exhibition flight here today, Hillery Beachey, 27 years old, and an airman since 1909, sustained a compound fracture of the upper right arm and possible internal injuries.
According to Beachey's mechanic, a strained center section of the upper wing, working loose in the flight, caused the accident.
"While the plane was being assembled," the mechanic said, "some of the helpers dropped a shipping crate containing portions of the wings. A strained center section resulted.  The part tore loose from its moorings in the air.  Diving abruptly to the ground Beachey crashed into a fence before the forward motion of his machine could be checked."
Beachey is the brother of Lincoln Beachey, the noted Curtiss aviator.  He began his aeronautical career in 1907, as a rigger for his brother, who was at that time a designer, builder and pilot of small dirigible balloons.
Associated with Howard Gill, in Indianapolis, in the winter of 1909, the injured airman built and flew his first aeroplane, a Curtiss-type machine. The machine which he was flying today was a Hamilton biplane. 
___

BROOKINS STAR FLIES UP HIGH AT AIR MEETING
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INDIANAPOLIS, June 17, 1911 (E.B.) - the Wright exhibition team, composed of the four aviators trained by Orville Wright, at Mont-
[[/Column 1]]

[[Column 2]]
DEATH CALLS TWO AVIATORS ON SAME DAY 
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LOS ANGELES, Dec. 31, 1910 (E.B.) - today was indeed a dark day in the annals of American aviation. 

Hardly had the word of John B. Moisant's fatal crash at New Orleans been telegraphed here, than Arch Hoxsey, the famous Wright aviator, who had earlier in the week broken the world's altitude mark with an ascent of 11,474 feet, plunged to his doom at Dominguez field.

Hoxsey's death followed an unexplicable crash from an altitude of about 500 feet. He was descending from a higher elevation when something went wrong with his machine causing it to nose over into a steeper angle, and enter a plummet-like plunge towards the earth. 

With the echo of the ensuing crash still hanging in the air, Hoxsey's faithful mechanic siezed a broken piece of strut and began a tearful patrol of the wreckage in which his master's body was entangled.

"They won't treat Arch like the crowd did Johnstone at Denver," he cried. "Just let anybody try to come near." 

The mechanic referred to the morbid rush for souvenirs by spectators at Denver, Nov. 17 last, following a crash in which Ralph Johnstone was killed. One member of the throng, during the frantic struggle for mementos which ensued, is said to have borne away in a triumph a bloody sliver of wood which had impailed Johnstone's body, and another to have stripped the gloves from the aviator's hands. 

Walter Brookins, a team-mate of Hoxsey, and of Johnstone, witnessed the accident today from a
[[/Column 2]]

[[Column 3]]
RODGERS SOARS MOST HOURS AT MEET 
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CHICAGO, August 20, 1911 (E.B.)-The eight-day aviation meet, held in Grant Park, facing Lake Michigan, came to a conclusion today with cash awards, said to total $80,000 being divided amongst the participants.

T. O. M. Sopwith, the English flier, who used both a Bleriot monoplane and a Howard Wright biplane here, received $13,520 in prize money. Lincoln Beachey, the Curtiss aviator, who set a new world's altitude mark at 11,642 feet today, received $11,162. C.P. Rodgers, a recent graduate of the Wright flying school, received $10,785, and W. G. Beatty and A. L. Welsh, Wright flyers, received $6,625 and $5,621 respectively. 

Rodger's spent the most time in the air of any aviator who participated in the meet. Flying a total of 29 out of a possible 33 hours his earnings in the daily duration events totalled, at the rate of $5 per minute, $8,700.

Following his successful Chicago appearance Rodgers plans to have a special type biplane built by the Wright brothers, and will attempt to win the $50,000 prize offered by William Randolph Hearst for the first coast to coast flight.

Rodgers is a great grandson of the Commodore Calbraith Perry, who in 1854 opened the ports of Japan to the world, and a grand nephew of Oliver Hazard Perry.
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JOHNSTONE UPS WORLD'S RECORD FOR ALTITUDE 
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BELMONT PARK, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1910 (E.B.)-On this the con
[[/Column 3]]

[[image - two postage stamps]]
[[image - illustration of Curtiss Biplane]]
Beachey's New "Headless" Curtiss Biplane

DIVES OVER CREST OF FALLS INTO RISING CLOUDS OF MIST FLIES UNDER STEEL BRIDGE
[[line]]

[[column 4]]
NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y., June 27, 1911 (E.B.)-While 150,000
[[/column 4]]

[[column 5]]
the end of each trip. In 1906 he became associated with Chas. C.
[[/column 5]]



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