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[[images: photographs of the following men]]

5. E. Jerry Williams - Imperial Deputy -
   Oasis
7. Lewis J. Brown - Imperial Organizer
8. William D. Kid - High Priest and Prophet
9. William E. Carter - Recorder
10. Rufus A. Tucker - Secretary
14. Lucius W. Leeper - Past Potentate
15. Arthur R. Brook - Past Potentate
16. Lawrence E. Mason - Past Potentate
20. Peter L. Redman - Committeeman
21. Bernard Morton - Committeeman
22. Bernard Smith - Committeeman

JERUSALEM TEMPLE, NO. 4
ARABIC ORDER NOBLES MYSTC
AMERICA & ITS JURISDICTION, INC
DESERT OF MARYLAND
6:00 P.M.
ANNUAL PAST POTENTATES
CONVOCATION AND EXALTATION
8:00 P.M.
NIGHT BUSINESS SESSION IMPERIAL COUNCIL
8:00 P.M.
HOST TEMPLE ENTERTAINMENT FEATURE
7:00 A.M.
OFFICIAL GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
8:00 A.M.
ANNUAL MUSIC FESTIVAL
BALTIMORE CIVIC CENTER
11:30 A.M.
ASSEMBLE FOR ANNUAL GRAND STREET PARADE
1:00 P.M.
ANNUAL SHRINE STREET PARADE
4:00 P.M.
TB&C BOARD OF DIRECTORS
4:00 to 6:00 P.M
ANNUAL HOSPITALITY BALTIMORE CIVIC CENTER HOWARD ROOM
7:00 P.M.
ANNUAL COMPETITIVE DRILL
BALTIMORE CIVIC CENTER

THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1969
8:00 P.M.
NIGHT SESSION IMPERIAL COUNCIL
FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1969
6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M.
DINNER WITH IMPERIAL POTENTATE
200-300 Persons
10:00 P.M. - 2:00 A.M.
IMPERIAL POTENTATE'S BALL
BALTIMORE CIVIC CENTER

August 17-22 1969
The Illustrious Potentate, Rabbans, and Nobles of Jurusalem Temple No. 4, welcomes the imperial Council and its subordinate Temples in Session of the 76th. Annual Convention of the Shrine Organization, in Baltimore, with the Lord Baltimore Hotel and the Emerson Hotel as convention headquarters.

Jerusalem Temple No. 4 was chartered October 4, 1893, and has the distinction of being the only Temple, that has had three local Nobles to serve as Imperial Potentate, Noble Hiram Watty, Noble John H. Murphy Sr., and Noble John H. Murphy Jr.

Being a charitable and fraternal organization, our major programs are those of service and benevolence.

The Shrine Organization (also called Shrinedom) is an institution, having been established on principle of life and living, which applies as principles were developed, practiced and promoted through successive generations unto today.

These principles ultimately became a customary way of life. This customary way of life was practiced by the Mohammedan society. The Mohammedan society was extended far and wide from its base around the Red Sea, but easterly and westerly in general. During this period of extension, the learned people of North Africa, around the universities or centers of intellect and knowledge, wore red "hats." The red "hat" or Fez was adopted by the Mohammedan society, and is worn even today by such men.

Unfortunately, in these days, a misinterpretation of the Fez exists.
Members of the Mohammedan society are called Moslems, Muslems and Muslims. Whatever confusion may exist today between Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Shrinedom is a consequence of complexion and lack of public knowledge. THE PLEDGE and the NEXT PAGE and DISTINGUISHING SYMBOLS on OUR FEZ SHOULD CLARIFY MISCONCEPTIONS WHICH CURRENTLY PREVAIL about JERUSALEM TEMPLE No. 4 (as well as other Shriners, who are not accepted Caucasians).

The Pledge of The Nobility is the Pledge of Jerusalem Temple No. 4, A.E.A.O.N M S

Among the obligations of the Shrinedom is the practice of charity, unrestricted to race, religion or national origin. Admittedly, the Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Noble of the Mystic Shrine practices charity, predominantly unto persons not of fair complexion - because charity should begin at home.


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