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(An informative advertisement and a free offer)

Take this simple quiz to see if you need this book.  
The wrong answers could cost you money.

1. THE CHIEF DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A STANDARD AND INTERMEDIATE SIZE CAR IS:
[ ] 500 pounds
[ ] $200-$300
[ ] Standard is approx. 12" longer

2. YOU NEVER GET YOUR MONEY OUT OF AIR CONDITIONING WHEN YOU TRADE OR SELL:
[ ] True
[ ] False

3. A LARGER, OPTIONAL ENGINE COULD BE WORTH THE EXTRA COST IF YOU:
[ ] Drive in city traffic
[ ] Drive with air conditioning
[ ] Drive in hilly country

4. THE PRINCIPAL ADVANTAGE OF DISC BRAKES OVER DRUM BRAKES IS:
[ ] Better stopping
[ ] Longer wear

5. AUTOMATIC SPEED CONTROL CAN:
[ ] Save on gasoline
[ ] Earn a lower insurance rate

We Listen. In the next 12 months, 10 million Americans will buy a new car.

For most, that car - next to the house they buy - represents the biggest purchase of their life. If you're one of those people - and you had difficulty answering any or all of the questions above - you're not alone. Most people can't.

Today, with more than 40 different makes of domestic and imported cars on the market, with 400 different models and literally thousands of equipment combinations, buying a car can be pretty complicated.

Which is why Ford Motor Company has written a 144-page book called, "Car Buying Made Easier." And why over 175,000 people have written for it.

And if you plan to buy a new car in the year ahead, chance are you'll need it. Best of all, it's free.

THE BOOK NEEDED WRITING. IS IT BIASED BECAUSE FORD WROTE IT?

To a degree - yes.

As Ford Motor Company, we must confess a preference for our own products.

But to minimize the problem, we purposely divided the book into two sections. The information in the first section of the book applies to cars in general - Chevrolets, Plymouths, Cadillacs - as well as Lincolns, Mercurys and Fords.

ANSWERS:
[[shown upside down]]
1. All three 
2. False 
3. Drive with air conditioning. Drive in hilly country. 
4. Better stopping. 
5. Save on gasoline

SECTION I
How to buy the right car - even if it isn't one of ours

Section I of "Car Buying Made Easier" is devoted to helping you determine the right car for you.

It covers subjects like these:

• Compacts vs. subcompacts - what are the real differences?

• How to buy only as much engine as you really need. (The range includes everything from 50 cu. in. "fours" to 500 cu. in. V-8s.)

• What you should know about axle ratios. (The right one can improve gas mileage.)

And so it goes, page after page.

SECTION II
A guide to 1972 Ford Motor Company cars.

Section II is the "biased" part. It deals exclusively with Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury automobiles. It offers important facts, figures and specifications you need to know. We wrote it because, frankly, we want your business - and we figure a little information might just do the trick.

We have confidence in our products. We believe that if you become a smarter car buyer, we'll get our share of the business - and then some.

Do write for the book. While you're at it, let us know what's on your mind. Tell us how we can better serve you as a company.

We listen. And we listen better.

[[image - Ford logo]]
... has a better idea (we listen better)

[[image - black & white photograph of the cover page of the "Car Buying Made Easier" book]]  

[[form]]
FOR YOUR FREE BOOK, WRITE TO:
Ford Motor Company Listens
P.O. Box 1958
The American Road - 73
Dearborn, Michigan 48121

1. Check this box if you'd like to have a Ford [ ] or L-M [ ] dealer telephone you.

2. [ ] Check this one if you want to be left alone with your book. We promise to leave you in peace.

NAME [[blank line]]
(PLEASE PRINT)
ADDRESS [[blank line]]
CITY [[blank line]] PHONE [[blank line]]
STATE [[blank line]] ZIP [[blank line]]
OFFER EXPIRES SEPT. 1972
[[/form]]

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Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.