Viewing page 179 of 258

THE NEW YORK TIMES.
DR. H. H. LONG DIES; HEAD OF COLLEGE
Alabamian Was Pioneer in Race Relations Studies

By THOMAS A. JOHNSON

[[image - black & white photograph of Dr. Herman H. Long]]

Dr. Herman H. Long, president of Talladega College in Talladega, Ala., whose pioneering studies in race relations have significantly influenced intergroup relations in much of the United States, died Sunda night at the Citizens Hospital in Talladega after an illness of several weeks.  He was 64 years old.

Dr. Long, who was born in Birmingham, Ala., headed, in the 1940's, the Human Relations Institute of the American Missionary Association at Fisk University.  In this position, he
[[...]]sited numerous American
[[...]]ies to study race relations
[[...]] to carry out programs
[[...]]at battering such rela-
[[...]]s.
[[...]] published a study in 1949
[[...]]housing covenants that pro-
[[...]]the
[[...]]fectiveness and recognition.  His untimely death leaves an incalculable void in black higher education."

He was appointed president of Talladega, a predominantly black institution, and he added to the school's reputation as one of the main sources of black professional men and women.  About 80 percent of the students go on to graduate[[...]]

[[image - black & white photograph of Roland Hayes]]
The New York Times
Roland Hayes as he prepared for concert on his 75th birthday in 1962

Roland Hayes, 89, Concert TEnor, Son of a Former Slave, Is Dead

[[...]]Jan. 1 (AP)--Roland Hayes,
[[...]]who became an
[[...]]riers of poverty, and opened the world of conc[[...]]
Negro people..."
Paul Robeson, Maria[[...]]
[[...]]were[[...]]

Dr. DuBois's Widow Dies of Breast Cancer In China

By WILLIAM EGYIR

Mrs. Shirley Graham DuBois, widow of civil rights pioneer, Dr. W.E.B. DeBois, has died in Peking Hospital of breast cancer.  She was 69.

Chinese news agency Hsinhua reported Mrs. DuBois who had made pre[[...]]
to China for breast[[...]]
returned[[...]]
did Mrs. DuBois.  In an eulogy to Nkrumah, she wrote:
"From the time of his birth[[...]]ept. 21,
1909, in the little vill[[...]]to the
time of[[...]]mania,
[[...]]d as a
[[...]]total
[[...]]e of
[[...]]had
[[...]]un
[[...]]c
[[...]]l

Charles H. Alston, Artist, a Professor at City College, 69

[[image - black & white photograph of Prof. Charles H. Alston]]

Prof. Charles H. Alston, a painter and professor in the department of art at City College, died yesterday in his home at 1270 Fifth Avenue.  He was 69 years old.

Professor Alston, who attended Columbia College and at Columbia University, painted nonobjective oils and also worked as a sculptor and muralist.

His works hang in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Butler Institute of American Art in Iowa, the Universities of Nebraska and Atlanta, Howard University, the International Business Machines Corporation art collection and in the offices 
[[...]]National Association for the Ad-
[[...]]Colored People
[[...]]said in an inter-
[[...]]a thing
[[...]]
painting for more than 20 years at the Art Students League.

He won a Rosenwald Fellowship in 1939 and 1940, the Thomas B. Clarke Award from the National Academy of Design in 1971 and was, in 1975, the first recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award of[[...]]
[[...]]received a Guggenheim[[...]]

Erroll Garner, Jazz Pianist, 53; Composed 'Misty,' 'That's My Kick'

[[image - black & white photograph of Erroll Garner]]
United Press International


[[...]]P) - Famed jazz pi-
[[...]]who made his debut
[[...]]ted wrote "Misty,"
[[...]]yesterday.  He was
[[...]]
[[...]]described as one
[[...]]distinguished jazz
[[...]]ers, had been suf-
[[...]]for several years
[[...]]dars-Sinai Medical
[[...]]to his doctor.  He
[[...]]from the hospital
[[...]]r. Garner's works
[[...]]s as "Dreamy,"
[[...]]and "That's My
[[...]]in Pittsburgh in
[[...]]al pianist seven
[[...]]ssional career
[[...]]fame.  He con-
[[...]]tours in this
[[...]]ng his debut in
[[...]]Prix du Disque
[[...]]in 1957 and in
[[...]]est pianist by
[[...]]tics Poll of
[[...]]k," was 
[[...]]b ythe[[...]]
[[...]]zz and[[...]]
Mr[[...]]Los[[...]]
[[...]]and
[[...]]wn

[[...]]d me[[...]]
[[...]]him[[...]]
[[...]]Negro[[...]]
[[...]]and ev[[...]]
[[...]]want[[...]]
[[...]]m his ini[[...]]
[[...]]k him in[[...]]
[[...]]fraid for[[...]]
[[...]]anymore[[...]]
[[...]]his[[...]]

Julius Watkins, Musician, Dies in Jersey

Funeral rites for Julius Watkins, famed musician-composer will be held at the David Woody Memorial Home in Orange, N.J. on Friday, April 8.

Watkins, who lived at 20 Nishuane Road,
[[...]]died 8:30 p.m. Monday at
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.